Accredited Ghost Stories

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J. Andrews, 1823 - Ghosts - 235 pages
 

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Page 1 - Imlac,) I will not undertake to maintain, against the concurrent and unvaried testimony of all ages, and of all nations. There is no people, rude or learned, among whom apparitions of the dead are not related and believed. This opinion, which prevails' as far as human nature is diffused, could become universal only by its truth...
Page 226 - ... in the morning thou shalt say, Would God it were even! and at even thou shalt say, Would God it were morning ! for the fear of thine heart wherewith thou shalt fear, and for the sight of thine eyes which thou shalt see.
Page 196 - Chelmsford for a physician and surgeon, who both came immediately; but the physician could discern no indication of what the lady imagined, or of any indisposition of her body ; notwithstanding the lady would needs have her let blood, which was done accordingly. And when the young woman had patiently let them do what they would with her, she desired that the chaplain might be called to read prayers ; and when prayers were ended, she took her guitar and psalm-book, and...
Page 13 - ... death. This I think very remarkable ; he was so pressed with the matter of fact, which he could not have the confidence to deny, that he was forced to account for it by one of the most absurd, unphilosophical notions that was ever started.
Page 168 - I'll get something to drink in for all that ; but Mrs. Veal waived it, and said, It is no matter, let it alone ; and so it passed. All the time I sat with Mrs. Bargrave, which was some hours, she recollected fresh sayings of Mrs.
Page 60 - ... people of the house what Ford could be doing there. They told him Ford was dead. The waiter took a fever, in which he lay for some time. When he recovered, he said he had a message to deliver to some women from Ford; but he was not to tell what, or to whom. He walked out; he was followed; but somewhere about St. Paul's they lost him. He came back, and said he had delivered the message, and the women exclaimed, "Then we are all undone!
Page 150 - When we came into the nursery, it was knocking in the next room ; when we went there, it was knocking in the nursery. And there it continued to knock, though we came in, particularly at the head of the bed (which was of wood) in which Miss Hetty and two of her younger sisters lay. Mr. Wesley observing that they were much affected, — though asleep, sweating, and trembling...
Page 144 - So she rose, put her book under her arm, and walked slowly away. After supper, she was sitting with my sister Sukey (about a year older than her) in one of the chambers, and telling her what had happened.
Page 164 - Mrs. Bargrave then, to satisfy her importunity, was going to fetch a pen and ink, but Mrs. Veal said, " Let it alone now, and do it when I am gone; but you must be sure to do it"; which was one of the last things she enjoined her at parting. And so she promised her. Then Mrs. Veal asked for Mrs. Bargrave's daughter. She said she was not at home. " But if you have a mind to see her,
Page 174 - I know ; and had it not come to light by accident, it would never have been made public. But now, she says, she will make her own private use of it, and keep herself out of the way as much as she can ; and so she has done since. She says, She had a gentleman who came thirty miles to her to hear the relation ; and that she had told it to a room full of people at a time.

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