Drive: The Surprising Truth about what Motivates Us

Front Cover
Canongate, 2010 - Self-Help - 242 pages
3445 Reviews

We've been conditioned to think that the best way to motivate ourselves and others is through external rewards like money or fame, or by the fear of punishment - the carrot-and-stick approach. That's a mistake, Daniel H. Pink says in his transformative new book. The key to high performance and satisfaction is intrinsic, internal motivation: the desire to follow your own interests and understand the benefits in them for you. In Drive, Pink lays out the hard science for these surprising insights; describes how people and corporations can embrace them; offers details about how we can master them; and provides concrete examples of how intrinsic motivation works on the job, at home and in ourselves.

This is a book of big ideas that explains how each of us can find the surest pathway to high performance, creativity and even health and well-being.

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Review: Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us

User Review  - Michael - Goodreads

If you're tired of carrots and sticks as extrinsic motivators in the workplace, this is the book for you. Pink argues that intrinsic motivators are superior for achieving results in today's "workplace ... Read full review

Review: Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us

User Review  - Dave Pereira - Goodreads

This gives me hope that I too can write a whole book on one chapter of information. Read full review

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About the author (2010)

Daniel H. Pink is the author of the long-running New York Times and BusinessWeek bestseller A Whole New Mind. He has written for the New York Times, Harvard Business Review, Fast Company and Wired, wherehe is a contributing editor. He has provided analysis for CNN, CNBC,ABC, NPR and other networks in the U.S. and abroad. Pink lectures on economic transformation and the new workplace at corporations, associations and universities around the world, and was a keynote speaker at TED's 2009 Global Conference in Oxford. He lives in Washington DC, with his family.

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