Cruchley's Picture of London, or visitor's assistant

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G.F. Cruchley, 1851 - London (England) - 323 pages
 

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Page 89 - When I look upon the tombs of the great, every emotion of envy dies in me ; when I read the epitaphs of the beautiful, every inordinate desire goes out; when I meet with the grief of parents upon a tombstone, my heart melts with compassion ; when I see the tomb of the parents themselves, I consider the vanity of grieving for those whom we must quickly follow...
Page 90 - When I see kings lying by those who deposed them, when I consider rival wits placed side by side, or the holy men that divided the world with their contests and disputes, I reflect with sorrow and astonishment on the little competitions, factions, and debates of mankind.
Page 213 - Paul's, should be rebuilt from their foundations with all magnificence; that bridges, gates, and prisons should be made new ; the sewers cleansed ; the streets made straight and regular; such as were steep, levelled, and those too narrow, made wider; markets and shambles removed to separate places. They also enacted, that every house should be built with...
Page 213 - To the estates and fortunes of the citizens it was merciless, but to their lives very favourable, that it might in all things resemble the last conflagration of the world.
Page 213 - Faith, a most gracious prince, commiserating the deplorable state of things, whilst the ruins were yet smoking provided for the comfort of his citizens, and the ornament of his city ; remitted their taxes, and referred the petitions of the magistrates and inhabitants to the parliament ; who immediately passed an act, that public works should be restored to greater beauty, with public money, to be raised by an imposition on coals; that churches, and the cathedral of St. Paul's, should be rebuilt from...
Page 133 - Near this place lies Abraham Cowley, " the Pindar, Horace, and Virgil of England ; and the delight, " ornament, and admiration of his age...
Page 219 - British empire, a public institution for diffusing the knowledge and facilitating the general introduction of useful mechanical inventions and improvements, and for teaching, by courses of philosophical lectures and experiments, the application of science to the common purposes of life.
Page 213 - Charles II., son of Charles the martyr, king of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, a most gracious prince, commiserating the deplorable state of things, whilst the ruins were yet smoking, provided for the comfort of his citizens, and the ornament of his city ; remitted their taxes, and referred the petitions of the magistrates and inhabitants to the parliament, who immediately passed an act, That public...
Page 284 - ... feelings of awe and solemnity so much in unison with the sacred character of the edifice. The other windows, with the exception of that above the altar, which will be described in the account of the choir, are of minor importance in point of size and attraction. The east window, in the south aisle, represents the Angel appearing unto the Shepherds with the Annunciation of the Nativity, and the western one depicts the Birth of the Redeemer. The subject of the west window, in the north aisle, is...
Page 267 - ... settlement. The building consists of a large quadrangle, one side of which is occupied by a spacious hall, in which is a picture by Holbein, representing the presentation of the charter of the hospital to the corporation of London by king Edward, and some other paintings.

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