The Man Who Sold the World: David Bowie and the 1970s

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HarperCollins, Aug 13, 2013 - Biography & Autobiography - 512 pages
“Astonishing and absorbing…from glam rock, minimalism and punk, to radical left-wing politics, music video, and a mass of other subjects that helped shape the ideas behind Bowie’s songs.”
—Sunday Times (London)
 
The Man Who Sold the World by Peter Doggett—author of the critically acclaimed Beatles biography, You Never Give Me Your Money—is a song-by-song chronicle of the evolution of David Bowie. Focusing on the work and the life of one of the most groundbreaking figures in music and popular culture during the turbulent seventies, Bowie’s most productive and innovative period, The Man Who Sold the World is the book that serious rock music lovers have been waiting for. By exploring Bowie’s individual achievements and breakthroughs one-by-one, Doggett paints a fascinating portrait of the performer who paved the way for a host of fearless contemporary artists, from Radiohead to Lady Gaga.

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THE MAN WHO SOLD THE WORLD: David Bowie and the 1970s

User Review  - Kirkus

Exhaustive survey of David Bowie and his music.Recent years have seen the publication of a variety of Bowie books, most notably the lengthy, impressive biographies by Marc Spitz (Bowie: A Biography ... Read full review

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User Review  - ElectricRay - LibraryThing

This book is custom made for people like me. I'm a decade too young to have copped David Bowie first time round (still in nappies when Ziggy played his farewell gig at Hammersmith) but discovered the ... Read full review

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About the author (2013)

Peter Doggett's books include Are You Ready for the Country: Elvis, Dylan, Parsons and the Roots of Country Rock,the award-winning There's a Riot Going On: Revolutionaries, Rock Stars and the Rise and Fall of the '60s, and You Never Give Me Your Money: The Beatles After the Breakup, which was chosen as one of the 10 Best Books of 2010 by the Los Angeles Times.

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