Women's Human Rights: CEDAW in International, Regional and National Law

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Anne Hellum, Henriette Sinding Aasen
Cambridge University Press, Jul 11, 2013 - Political Science
As an instrument which addresses the circumstances which affect women's lives and enjoyment of rights in a diverse world, the CEDAW is slowly but surely making its mark on the development of international and national law. Using national case studies from South Asia, Southern Africa, Australia, Canada and Northern Europe, Women's Human Rights examines the potential and actual added value of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women in comparison and interaction with other equality and anti-discrimination mechanisms. The studies demonstrate how state and non-state actors have invoked, adopted or resisted the CEDAW and related instruments in different legal, political, economic and socio-cultural contexts, and how the various international, regional and national regimes have drawn inspiration and learned from each other.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination
27
The United Nations Working Group on the Issue
62
a holistic approach to womens equality
95
The CEDAW as a legal framework for transnational discourses
124
Pulling apart? Treatment ofpluralism in the CEDAW and
183
the United Nations Human Rights Committee and
242
homes
268
Iudicial education on the Convention on Elimination
410
domesticating
430
pursuing womens equality
454
firmly rooted in Dutch
482
The CEDAW in the UK
511
from paradoxes
531
time to reclaim
557
the CEDAW in Norwegian
588

Maternal mortality and womens right to health
292
all womens rights
358
Indias CEDAW story
385

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About the author (2013)

Anne Hellum is a Professor at the Faculty of Law, Department of Public and International Law, University of Oslo, Norway.

Henriette Sinding Aasen is a Professor at the Faculty of Law, University of Bergen, Norway.

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