Tours in Upper India, and in Parts of the Himalaya Mountains; with Accounts of the Courts of the Native Princes, &c: By Major Archer, .. In Two Volumes, Volume 2

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Richard Bentley, New Burlington Street, (successor to Henry Colburn), 1833 - India - 356 pages
 

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Page iii - HIGH on a throne of royal state, which far Outshone the wealth of Ormus and of Ind, Or where the gorgeous East with richest hand Showers on her kings barbaric pearl and gold...
Page 36 - The same flat surface, but, if any thing, more sterile and uncultivated than for days past. At a quarter past four in the afternoon, his Excellency received a visit from Hindoo Rao, the brother of the Queen Regent; and of the class of insufferable and insolent-looking coxcombs, he outdoes them all. Moreover, he is a dandy of the first water, and a real Mahratta from the crown of his head to the soles of his feet. His character, as given by one long acquainted with him and the court of Scindeah, is...
Page 259 - ... to chalk out the way they themselves thought best. The consequence has been the want of success to the establishment, although so many years have elapsed since its birth. There are three great studs ; one in the Ghazepore district, a very large one; one at Haupper, near Meerut; and the third at Hissar, about one hundred miles north-west of Delhi, in a country possessing fine pastures, and celebrated S 2 for its breed of cattle. The controlling power is vested in a " Board of Superintendence for...
Page 16 - A man attached to the animal, and whose duty it is to clean him, and when at work to urge him forward with the application of a large stick, was acting in his vocation, when suddenly the elephant put out one of his hind feet, pulled the unfortunate fellow in under him, and commenced kicking him from his fore to his hind legs; an operation these animals perform with so much accuracy and celerity, as to jumble the...
Page 108 - Death; his medical attendants declaring he cannot last many months. When we passed, his liver was so much affected as to protrude his side to the size of a half quartern loaf. His state was one of great emaciation, and he was a truly pitiable object. His prayer (and it was unheeded) was to be permitted to die at Benares, but the suspicions of the government are too lively for this indulgence—no great one.
Page 322 - Y only in use. The vakeels, or attorneys, are those who alone thoroughly comprehend the mysticism of the law; for, with very few exceptions, the judge who presides is far from being competent to expound or comment upon the many disputed passages; and, as to the unfortunate suitors themselves, few even of the Mohammedan persuasion understand the Persian language, and of the Hindoos not one in ten thousand.
Page 298 - Government, which, with all the good-nature of fancied over-strength, gratuitously told the Burmese of the intended attack ; and, in the extensive preparations of some months, gave the enemy ample time to make the best defence in his power. If ever the bull was taken by the horns, it was on this occasion.
Page 298 - The Ava war, entered upon in all the hurry of fear, was of course not guided by judgment, either in the plan of operations or the most fitting time for commencing them. But I will not here...
Page 25 - The banks of the river are here prodigiously high, and are cut and perforated into enormous holes and ravines by the action of the rains, while the soil is a hard conker or conglomerated earth. The town, which overhangs these ravines, has a curious aspect, many of the houses appearing perched on crags which have been cut off from the main body.
Page 260 - To say the least, it was making very small of the veterans then members, one of whom was the father of the Calcutta turf, and two others were as good judges as Newmarket could ever boast of. The horse in question was an Arab, rather low...

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