Souvenir of modern minstrelsy: a collection of original and select poetry by living writers

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Page xi - And to-night I long for rest. Read from some humbler poet, Whose songs gushed from his heart, As showers from the clouds of summer, Or tears from the eyelids start ; Who, through long days of labor, And nights devoid of ease, Still heard in his soul the music Of wonderful melodies. Such songs have power to quiet The restless pulse of care, And come like the benediction That follows after prayer.
Page xii - Read from some humbler poet, Whose songs gushed from his heart, As showers from the clouds of summer, Or tears from the eyelids start; Who, through long days of labor And nights devoid of ease, Still heard in his soul the music Of wonderful melodies. Such songs have power to quiet The restless pulse of care, And come like the benediction That follows after prayer.
Page 82 - Look aloft!" and be firm, and be fearless of heart. If the friend who embraced In prosperity's glow, With a smile for each joy, and a tear for each woe, Should betray thee when sorrows like clouds are arrayed, "Look aloft!
Page xii - Still heard in his soul the music Of wonderful melodies. Such songs have power to quiet The restless pulse of care, And come like the benediction That follows after prayer. Then read from the treasured volume The poem of thy choice, And lend to the rhyme of the poet The beauty of thy voice. * And the night shall be filled with music, And the cares that infest the day, Shall fold their tents, like the Arabs, And as silently steal away.
Page 2 - When the dawn looked gray o'er the misty way, And the early air blew coldly; "Tick, tick," it said — "quick out of bed, For five I've given warning; You'll never have health, you'll never get wealth, Unless you're up soon in the morning.
Page 60 - And dropt i' the grave — God's lap — our wee White Rose of all the world. Our Rose was but in blossom, Our life was but in spring, When down the solemn midnight We heard the spirits sing, " "Another bud of infancy With holy dews impearled ! " And in their hands they bore our wee White Rose of all thj world.
Page 2 - A friendly voice was that old, old clock, As it stood in the corner smiling, And blessed the time with a merry chime, The wintry hours beguiling ; But a cross old voice was that tiresome clock, As it called at daybreak boldly, When the dawn looked gray o'er the misty way, And the early air blew coldly ; "Tick, tick...
Page 5 - Truer than e'er pomp arrayed! He who seeks the mind's improvement Aids the world, in aiding mind! Every great commanding movement Serves not one, but all mankind.
Page 53 - tis like a tale of olden Time, long, long ago ; When the world was in its golden Prime, and Love was lord below ! Every vein of earth was dancing With the Spring's new wine ! 'Twas the pleasant time of flowers, When I met you, love of mine. Ah ! some spirit sure was straying Out of heaven that day, When I met you, Sweet, a-Maying, In that merry, merry May. Little heart ! it shyly open'd Its red leaves' love-lore, Like a rose that must be ripen 'd To the dainty, dainty core.
Page 4 - WHAT is noble? to inherit Wealth, estate, and proud degree? There must be some other merit, Higher yet than these for me. Something greater far must enter Into life's majestic span; Fitted to create and centre True nobility in man!

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