The London prisons. To which is added, a description of the chief provincial prisons

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Page 418 - I despatched her safe, and went partly down stairs to meet Mrs Mills, who had the precaution to hold her handkerchief to her face, as was very natural for a woman to do when she was going to bid her last farewell to a friend on the eve of his execution. I had indeed desired her to do it, that my lord might go out in the same manner.
Page 39 - I might easily suffer that, if they would keep my body warm. But my diet also, God knoweth how slender it is at many times. And now in mine age my stomach may not away but with a few kinds of meats, which if I want I decay forthwith, and fall into coughs and diseases of my body, and cannot keep myself in health.
Page 417 - Tower, having so many things in my hands to put in readiness ; but in the evening, when all was ready, I sent for Mrs Mills, with whom I lodged, and acquainted her with my design of attempting my Lord's escape, as there was no prospect of his being pardoned ; and this was the last night before the execution. I told her that I had...
Page 420 - I perceived it was growing dark, and was afraid that the light of the candles might betray us ; so I resolved to set off. I went out, leading him by the hand ; and he held his handkerchief to his eyes. I spoke to him in the most afflicted and piteous tone of voice; bewailing bitterly the negligence of Evans, who had ruined me by her delay. Then said I, My dear Mrs.
Page 418 - Mills was then with child ; so that she was not only of the same height, but nearly the same size as my lord. When we were in the coach, I never ceased talking, that they might have no leisure to reflect. Their surprise and astonishment, when I first opened my design to them, had made them consent without ever thinking of the consequences. On our arrival in the Tower, the first I introduced was Mrs.
Page 419 - Every body in the room, who were chiefly the guards' wives and daughters, seemed to compassionate me exceedingly ; and the sentinel officiously opened the door. When I had seen her out, I returned back to my Lord, and finished dressing him. I had taken care that Mrs. Mills did not go out crying, as...
Page 112 - To our most loving friend, Mr. Philip Hinchlow, esquire, These, " Mr. Hinchlow, " You understand our unfortunate extremitie, and I doe not thincke you so void of cristianitie but that you would throw so much money into the Thames as wee request now of you, rather than endanger so many innocent lives.
Page 415 - I strongly solicited to be permitted to see my lord, which they refused to grant me unless I would remain confined with him in the Tower. This I would not submit to, and alleged for excuse, that my health would not permit me to undergo the confinement. The real reason of my refusal was, not to put it out of my power to accomplish my design : However, by bribing the guards...
Page 416 - Countess concerned, it was incumbent upon her to have it presented. We had but one day left before the execution, and the Duke still promised to present the petition; but, for fear he should fail, I engaged the Duke of Montrose to secure its being done by one or the other.
Page 424 - Grace said she would go to court, to see how the news of my Lord's escape was received. When the news was brought to the king, he flew into an excess of passion, and said he was betrayed ; for it could not have been done without some confederacy. He instantly despatched two persons to the Tower, to see that the other prisoners were well secured, lest they should follow the example.

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