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" The longitude of any place is the arc of the equator, intercepted between the meridian of that place and the first meridian; the longitude, therefore, is the measure of the angle between the two meridians. "
An Introduction to the Elements of Practical Astronomy - Page 102
by James R. Christie - 1853 - 118 pages
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A new, complete, and universal English dictionary [by J. Marchant and ...

John Marchant (gent.) - 1764
...dilbnces. LO'NGITUDE [ S. ] the length of any thing that is теаГигаЫс. In Geography, it ian arch of the. equator, intercepted between the meridian of that place and the firH meridian. In Autonomy, it a аи arch of the LOO ecliptic, counted from the beginning of anei,...
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Encyclopaedia Perthensis; Or Universal Dictionary of the Arts ..., Volume 10

Encyclopedias and dictionaries - 1816
...diftance between each two of thefe femiciicies is 15*, being the i4th part of 360. The LONGITUDE of any place on the earth is an arc of the equator intercepted between the meridian paffing through that place and ibme other meridian prcvioufly agreed upon, vhich is called the firft...
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Pantologia. A new (cabinet) cyclopædia, by J.M. Good, O. Gregory ..., Volume 7

John Mason Good - 1819
...LONGITUDE nfa Place, in geography, it in longitudinal distance from some first meridian, or an arch of the equator intercepted between the meridian of that place and the first meridian. LONGITUDE i« tïte Hcavrn», as of a star, &c. is an arch of ilie ecliptic, counted...
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The Complete Mathematical and General Navigation Tables: Including ..., Volume 1

Thomas Kerigan - Nautical astronomy - 1828 - 664 pages
...longitude of any place can never exceed 1 80 degrees. The difference of Longitude between two places on the earth is an arc of the equator intercepted between the meridians of those places ; showing how far one of them is to the eastward or westward of the other...
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Elements of Plane and Spherical Trigonometry: With Its Applications to the ...

John Radford Young - Nautical astronomy - 1833 - 264 pages
...the meridian of Greenwich Observatory for the first meridian. 4. The longitude of any place is the arc of the equator, intercepted between the meridian of that place and the first meridian; the longitude, therefore, is the measure of the angle between the two meridians. The...
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Elements of Trigonometry, Plane and Spherical: Adapted to the Present State ...

Charles William Hackley - Trigonometry - 1838 - 307 pages
...the meridian of Greenwich Observatory for the first meridian. 4. The longitude of any place is the arc of the equator, intercepted between the meridian of that place and the first meridian ; the longitude, therefore, is the measure of the angle between the two meridians. The...
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The Complete Mathematical and General Navigation Tables: Including Every ...

Thomas Kerigan - Nautical astronomy - 1838
...longitude of any place can never exceed 180 degrees. The difference of Longitude between two places on the earth is an arc of the equator intercepted between the meridians of those places ; showing how far one of them is to the eastward or westward of the other...
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Elements of Surveying, and Navigation, with a Description of the Instruments ...

Charles Davies - Navigation - 1841 - 359 pages
...the meridian of Greenwich Observatory for the first meridian. 5. The longitude of any place is the arc of the equator intercepted between the meridian of that place and the first meridian, and is east or west, according as the place lies east or west of the first meridian....
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The improved coaster's guide, and Marine board examination, for the east ...

Alexander Baharie - 1844
...the northward or southward of the other. The difference of latitude can never exceed 180 degree*. 12. Longitude of a place on the earth is an arc of the equator comprehended between the meridian passing through the Royal Observatory at Greenwich and that meridian...
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A Text-book on Natural Philosophy: For the Use of Schools and Colleges ...

John William Draper - Physics - 1847 - 381 pages
...therefore, in the horizon ; at the pole it is in the zenith. The longitude of a place on the earth is the arc of the equator intercepted between the meridian of that place and that of another place taken as a standard. The observatory of Greenwich is the standard position very...
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