Urbanism in the Preindustrial World: Cross-Cultural Approaches

Front Cover
Glenn Storey
University of Alabama Press, Apr 3, 2006 - Social Science - 560 pages
0 Reviews
A baseline study of the growth of preindustrial cities worldwide.

This work employs a subset of preindustrial cities on many continents to answer questions archaeologists grapple with concerning the populating and growth of cities before industrialization. It further explores how scholars differently conceive and execute their research on the population of cities. The subject cities are in Greece, Mesoamerica, the Andes, Italy, Egypt, Africa, United States, Denmark, and China. This broad sample provides a useful framework for answers to such questions as “Why did people agglomerate into cities?” and “What population size and what age of endurance constitute a city?”

The study covers more than population magnitude and population makeup, the two major frameworks of urban demography. The contributors combine their archaeological and historical expertise to reveal commonalities, as well as theoretical extrapolations and methodological approaches, at work here and outside the sample.

Urbanism in the Preindustrial World is a unique study revealing the variety of factors involved in the coalescing and dispersal of populations in preindustrial times.

 

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Table I1 Subject guide to chapters
3
The Growth of Greek Cities in the First Millennium
27
Table 11 Conventional periodization
28
Copyright

28 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2006)

Glenn R. Storey, University of Iowa, is a Roman archaeologist jointly appointed in Classics and Anthropology and specializing in Roman demography, economy, and urbanization.

Bibliographic information