The Arrow of Love: Optics, Gender, and Subjectivity in Medieval Love Poetry

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Bucknell University Press, 2003 - Literary Criticism - 186 pages
As medieval poets sought new ways to describe visual interactions, many turned to the rapidly growing field of optical theory, which offered not only an array of images and metaphors but also models for the perceiving subject that could be adapted to poetic use. In particular, optical imagery and paradigms afforded poets a new approach to the roles of the languishing male and his powerful beloved."--BOOK JACKET.
 

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Contents

Through a Glass Brightly Vision and the Arrow of Love in Chrétien de Troyess Cligés
33
Languishing Lovers at the Court of Frederick II
49
Guido Cavalcantis Philosophical Poetics of Passivity
81
Optics and Subjectivity in Dantes Rime and Convivio
102
Epilogue
124
Notes
139
Bibliography
167
Index
177
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Page 34 - ... inventum medicina meum est, opiferque per orbem dicor, et herbarum subiecta potentia nobis: ei mihi, quod nullis amor est sanabilis herbis, nee prosunt domino, quae prosunt omnibus, artes!
Page 21 - Amor est passio quaedam innata procedens ex visione et immoderata cogitatione formae alterius sexus, ob quam aliquis super omnia cupit alterius potiri amplexibus et omnia de utriusque voluntate in ipsius amplexu amoris praecepta compleri.
Page 34 - Dianae." ille quidem obsequitur, sed te decor iste quod optas esse vetat, votoque tuo tua forma repugnat: Phoebus amat visaeque cupit conubia Daphnes, 490 quodque cupit, sperat, suaque illum oracula fallunt, utque leves stipulae demptis adolentur aristis, ut facibus saepes ardent, quas forte viator vel nimis admovit vel iam sub luce reliquit, sic deus in flammas abiit, sic pectore toto 495 uritur et sterilem sperando nutrit amorem. spectat inornatos collo pendere capillos et "quid, si comantur?

About the author (2003)

Dana Stewart is Associate Professor of Italian and Fellow of the Center of Medieval and Renaissance Studies at the State University of New York at Binghamton.

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