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Where'er he rests, where'er he moves,
Regard him with your purest loves !
And may his coming, like the dove's,

Bring love and peace, and a' that!
Ah! mony a dowy day has been
Since Scotland saw a King or Queen!
Kingdoms and States, and Thrones, I ween,

Ha'e been o’erturned since a' that!
Yet SCOTLAND, without crack or flaw,
Stands fast and firm, and ne'er shall fa?
While Virtue, amang great and sma',

Adorns her bairns, and a' that!
Then cock your bonnets, (ilka blade ;
And, busk it in your belted plaid,
Let rites and honours due be paid

To Royalty, and a' that:
Though Kings and Queens of bigh renown
Ha'e flourished aft in Embro-town,
A better never wore the crown

Than George the Fourth, for a' that!
But, oh! wbile guns and cannons roar,
And plaudits welcome him on shore,
The heart is wounded to the core

That we maun part, for a' that;
Yet fill your goblets till they foam;
And when the King's disposed to roam,
He'll look on Scotland as his home,

And come again, and a' that! His Majesty left Scotland on the 29th of August, embarking at Port Edgar, the royal yacht being towed by the James Watt steam-packet. At six o'clock P.M., a salute from the batteries announced that the royal squadron was at sea, and the wind was as favourable as could be desired. The royal fleet arrived at Greenwich on the 1st of September, at nearly the same hour it had quitted its moorings on the 10th of August.-A complete historical detail of this event, with all its attendant circumstances, will be found in Blackwood's Magazine for September 1822, nearly the whole number (140 closely printed column pages) being dedicated to the subject. We have only room for

U

L'Envoy,
TO THE KING.

Christopher North.
HERE CLOSE WE FOR THE PRESENT! THIS, O KING!

THIS NUMBER DO WE DEDICATE TO THEE,
LOWLY AND REVERENTLY ON BENDED KNEE,
OUR LOYAL TRIBUTE HUMBLY OFFERING,
WHILE WE HAVE HAND TO WRITE, OR VOICE TO SING,

WHILE WE HAVE MASTERY OF VERSE AND PROSE,
IN SHORT, WHILE THROUGH OUR HEART THE LIFE.

BLOOD FLOWS,
SIMILAR TRIBUTE SHALL WE JOY TO BRING.
AND THOUGH OLD AGE HATH LAID. UPON OUR HEAD

THE SNOW OF THREESCORE WINTERS, YET, IF E'ER NEED SHOULD ARISE-IF DAYS OF DOUBT AND DREAD

SUMMON US IN THY CAUSE, THE FIGHT TO DARE,

AGE-STRICKEN AS WE ARE, WE FORTI SHOULD FARE. OUR BLOOD, AS CRIMSON AS OUR TYPE, TO SHED!

*20. 1547.—THE FIRST BOOK OF HOMILIES, Published by Cranmer. This, together with the second Book, published in 1563, however obsolete it may have become in some respects, is nevertheless a most valuable standard of the doctrines of the Church of England; and it is well deserving of that fresh circulation which has been given to it of late years by the Institution of the Prayer Book and Homily Society, and by the Society for promoting Christian Knowledge admitting it into their catalogue; both Societies, too, have printed the Homilies in separate tracts, so that they bid fair to be more generally diffused and known in the nineteenth century, than they were in the sixteenth.

24.-SAINT BARTHOLOMEW. . The word Bartholomew means the son of Tolmai, or Tolomæus, the name of a family among the Jews, mentioned by Josephus. He preached the Gospel in Armenia, converted the Lycaonians, and afterwards visited India. Some authors assert that he was crucified, like St. Peter, with his head downwards; others, however, with more probability, say, that he was flayed alive, by order of Astyages, King of Armenia.- On the massacre of St. Bartholomew, see T.T. for 1821, p. 217. . *25. 1822.-SIR W. HERSCHEL, KNT., LL.D., F.R.S.,

LOND. AND ED., DIED, ÆT. 83; President of the Astronomical Society; and Member of nearly all the principal scientific bodies of Europe and America. This distinguished astronomer was born at Hanover, November 15, 1738; his father being a musician, brought up his four sons, of whom Sir William was the second, to the same profession, and placed him, at the age of fourteen, in the band of the Hanoverian Foot Guards. Unable, however, long to endure the drudgery of such a situation, and conscious of superior proficiency in his art, he determined on quitting the regiment, and seeking his fortune in England, where he arrived about the year 1757. After struggling with great difficulties in London, he was engaged by the Earl of Darlington to superintend and instruct a military band then forming by that nobleman in the county of Durham; and the opening thus afforded contributed so far to increase his reputation and connexions, as to induce him to spend several years after the termination of this engagement in the neighbourhood of Leeds, Pontefract, Doncaster, &c., where he had many scholars, and led the public concerts and oratorios.

In 1766 he was chosen organist at Halifax, a situation he soon after resigned for the more advantageous one of organist to the Octagon Chapel at Bath. In this great and gay resort of fashion, his extraordinary musical talents procured him ample employment; and the direction of the public con

certs, and his private teaching, produced him a considerable income.

But though fond to enthusiasm of his profession, his ardent thirst for knowledge had begun for some time past to open a nobler field for his exertions. While at Halifax, he had commenced a course of mathematical reading; and in spite of the difficulty of such studies, acquired, without assistance, a considerable familiarity with the principles both of pure and applied mathematics. The sublime views disclosed by modern astronomy had powerfully attracted his attention; and when he read of the noble discoveries made by the assistance of the telescope, he was seized with an irresistible desire to see with his own eyes the wonders of which he read. Fortunately the price of an instrument capable of satisfying his curiosity was beyond his means, and he resolved to attempt the construction of one for himself. In this arduous task, after encountering endless difficulties, he succeeded; and in 1774 first saw Saturn in a five feet reflecting telescope, made by his own hands. Encouraged by this success, he now attempted larger telescopes, and soon completed a seven, a ten, and a twenty feet reflector; labouring with such obstinacy, as to have actually finished no less than 200 object mirrors before he could satisfy himself with the performance of one.

Astronomy now occupied so much of his attention, that he began to limit his professional engagements, and restrict the number of his scholars. About the latter end of 1779, he commenced a regular review of the Heavens, star by star, with a seven feet reflector; and having already continued this upwards of eighteen months, he was at length rewarded, on the 13th of March 1781, with the discovery of a new primary planet, to which he afterwards gave the name of Georgium Sidus, now more generally distinguished by that of Uranus.

In consequence of this memorable discovery, the

and restrict f 1779, he com star, with

attention of the scientific world became fixed upon him; and his late Majesty, with a promptitude of liberality which must ever be recorded to his honour as a patron of science, enabled him, by the settlement of a handsome salary, to discontinue his professional exertions, and devote the remainder of his life wholly to astronomy. Herschel now quitted Bath, and took up his residence at Datchet, in the neighbourhood of Windsor, where he was no sooner established, than he entered on a career of discovery, unexampled, perhaps, in the history of science. Having removed to Slough, he commenced the erection of a telescope of yet larger dimensions than any before attempted, which he completed in 1787; and aided by this stupendous instrument, and by others of hardly inferior power, he extended his researches to every part of the heavens, penetrating into regions of space of a remoteness eluding calculation, and developing views of the construction of our own system and the universe, of a daring sublimity, hardly more surprising than the strictness of the induction on which they rest. In these observations, and the laborious calculations into which they led, he was assisted throughout by his excellent sister, Miss - Caroline Herschel, whose indefatigable and unhesitating devotion in the performance of a task usually deemed incompatible with female habits, surpasses all eulogium. - Sir W. Herschel's discoveries were communicated as they arose to the Royal Society, and form an important part of the published transactions of that learned body from the year 1782 to 1818: many of these discoveries are detailed in the early volumes of Time's Telescope.

As an astronomer, Sir W. Herschel was surpassed by no one of the present age; and the depth of his scientific researches, and the extent of his observations, rendered him, perhaps, second only to the immortal Newton. He was interred in Upton

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