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1823;

FOR

| A Complete Guide to the Almanack:

CONTAINING AN EXPLANATION
Saints' Days and Holidays;

OF

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS OF BRITISH HISTORY AND ANTIQUITIES,

NOTICES OF OBSOLETE RITES AND CUSTOMS,
SKETCHES OF COMPARATIVE CHRONOLOGY,

AND

CONTEMPORARY BIOGRAPHY.
ASTRONOMICAL OCCURRENCES

IN EVERY MONTH :
COMPRISING REMARKS ON THE PHENOMENA OF THE CELESTIA BODIES,

With an account of indispensable
ASTRONOMICAL INSTRUMENTS;

AND
THE NATURALIST'S DIARY:

EXPLAINING TUB VARIOUS
APPEARANCES IN TIIE VEGETABLE AND ANIMAL KINGDOMS.

To which are prefixed,

An Introduction
ON THE HABITS, ECONOMY, AND USES OF
BRITISH INSECTS;

And an Ode to Time
BY BERNARD BARTOX.

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Second Edition.

PUBLISHED ANNUALLY.

London:
PRINTED FOR SHERWOOD, JONES, AND CO.,

Paternoster Row.

1824.

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• Time's Telescope is really so meritorious a work, that we cannot refuse it the meed of a willing gift,-unfeigned praise. Like its ten predecessors, this eleventh annual volume is an entertaining and well-selected miscellany from the good things of past literature, together with original productions of congenial character.'-Literary Gazette, Nov. 22, 1823.

« This work displays the same pleasing variety as was exhibited in the former volumes. It is one of those delightful books which is always welcome to us.'-Literary Chronicle, Nov. 29, 1823.

• In addition to the articles of information and amusement which the former volumes of this useful work contain, we are presented with a very elaborate essay on the “ Outlines of Historical and Physical Geography.” It appears to be accurate in its facts and reasoning, and is written in a pleasing style. Altogether, Time's Telescope is a work which deserves the highest patronage; and that it has received such patronage, is evident from the fact, that the present volume is quite equal, if not superior to its predecessors.'Literary Museum, Nov. 29, 1823.

* This useful and agreeable little work, which is at once an annual and a perennial in the garden of periodical Literature, has now reached the eleventh year of its revival, and yet still appears under a new aspect. It is another yet the same',an old friend with a new face"--and yet the better, instead of the worse on that account.'—New Monthly Magazine, Jan. 1, 1824.

We have more than once noticed the former volumes of this very agreeable miscellany, and we must do the ingenious Editor the justice to repeat, that his eleventh volume is by no means inferior in point of merit or variety to its predecessors. The work is, indeed, kept up with great spirit, and no pains have been spared to render it as useful as it is entertaining.'-Eclectic Review, Jan. 1, 1824.

"This volume, like its ten elder brethren, cannot fail of proving a very acceptable annual present. The Editor deserves commendation for cousiderable tact in selecting what is not only entertaining at the moment, but useful in affording solid information--and, what is highly praiseworthy, likely to lead the mind from Nature up to Nature's God.'- Gentleman's Magazine, December 1823.

- The number of Time's Telescope for the ensuing year is quite equal to its predecessors : there is no work of the kind with which we are acquainted, that contains such a variety of apposite and interesting matter: it is a work at once remarkable for ingenuity and industry.'-Times, Nov. 22, 1823.

We have given the title-page of this work almost at full length, in order that those of our readers who were not induced by our account of the two preceding volumes (for 1822 and 1823) to form a personal acquaintance with it, may at once perceive its nature; and may be prepared by a bill of fare soʻvery inviting to the mental appetite, for that feast of varied information and entertainment which it provides. The execution, we can assure them, does justice to the plan of this very interesting publication ; and continues to be highly creditable to the elegant taste and literary diligence of the respectable compiler. We cordially renew our former recommendations of it, especially to young persons of education and intelligence.' Wesleyan-Methodist Magazine, January 1824.

If the times are not better, still it must be owned that their Tele. scope is improving annually. Indeed, we think this little work deserves peculiar credit for its constant variety, whilst still preserving the original plan on which it started.'- New Monthly Magazine, December 1822.

"We have now had the gratification of approving the design and execution of this useful annual work for ten succeeding years; and can safely assert that the present volume is inferior to none of its predecessors. Novelty has been so studiously considered, that each volume is almost entirely a new work. The poetical selections are numerous and judiciously introduced.'-Gentleman's Magazine, December 1822.

“We are acquainted with no annual work which has united so many suffrages in its favour as Time's Telescope. The present publication does not derogate from the character of its predecessors, but is indeed an agreeable and instructive miscellany.'-Literary Gazette, December 7, 1822.

ma • This ingenious work is really worthy of public attention.'-John Bull, December 27, 1822.

• This publication will convey, to young persons of intelligence and education, much entertaining and useful information, without that corrupting admixture of unsound principles, or improper allusions, by which so large a portion of the current literature of our times is unhappily debased.- Wesleyan Methodist Magazine, Jan. 1823.

“This is an entertaining and instructive annual work.'-Courier, December 24, 1822.

“We have often had occasion to notice the periodical appearance of this useful work: in the variety and amusing quality of its contents, we know few works which can bear a comparison with Time's Telescope. We notice, with particular commendation, the poetical taste of the Editor, who has selected from the fugitive verses of the day many very beautiful and interesting specimens. The scientific department is got up with the same fidelity and cleverness which distinguished the former numbers of Time's Telescope.'-Monthly Magazine, Jan. 1823.

This is a very amusing book, and full of information on a variety of common-place topics, which people have in their mouths every day, and yet contrive to be profoundly ignorant of to the latest hour of their existence. History, antiquities, obsolete rites, biography, and a naturalist's diary, are only the prominent features of the work, which is as varied as it is amusing.'-Museum, June 7, 1823.

"The sustained excellence and improving reputation of this agreeable and highly useful series, afford a gratifying illustration of the extent, depth, and richness, of the resources of English literature; and of the sure reward which attends the exercise of industry and judgment in exploring them. The present volume fully supports the character of its predecessors; and saying this, we are not aware that we could give it a higher praise.'-St. James's Chronicle, December 10, 1822.

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