The British Presidency

Front Cover
Manchester University Press, 2000 - Education - 374 pages
0 Reviews
The Premiership of Tony Blair has not only reaffirmed previous trends towards leader-centered parties and governments, it has provided a decisive change in the development of a British presidency. The strategies and techniques designed to secure and expand Blair’s public outreach, together with the priority attached to the prime minister’s personal pledges and individual vision have propelled the office into new dimensions of independence. Michael Foley argues that the ascendancy of Blair is not an aberration, but rather a culmination of trends that have established vigorous leadership as a key criterion of political evaluation and governing competence. This edition is completely up-to-date, including the first convincing analysis of Tony Blair's leadership style.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Outsiders and spatial leadership in modern American politics
30
the Thatcher precedent
60
the Blair phenomenon
88
Going public and getting personal in the United States
116
John Major Tony Blair and the struggle for public outreach
146
Leadership stretch in Britain
205
and nation
240
Tony Blair and the British presidential dimension
301
Index
363
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2000)

Michael Foley is Professor of International Politics at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth.

Bibliographic information