History of United States Naval Operations in World War II: Operations in North African Waters, October 1942-June 1943

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University of Illinois Press, 2001 - History - 368 pages
Volume II: Operations in North African Waters, October 1942-June 1943 covers naval operations on the Atlantic coast of North Africa and in the Mediterranean. Morison focuses especially on "Operation Torch," the all-American effort to capture bases in French Morocco, thereby opening up a second front to relieve the Russians.
 

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Contents

PART
1
The Crossing 20 October7 November 1942
42
Landing at Fedhala 8 November 1942
55
The Naval Battle of Casablanca 8 November 1942
88
The Northern Attack 711 November 1942
114
The Southern Attack 711 November 1942
135
Morocco Secured 9 November1 December 1942
157
PART II
179
Bougie and Bne Secured
220
The Capture of Oran 811 November 1942
222
Hartland and Walney
225
The Landings
231
The Navy in the Tunisian Campaign November 1942May 1943
239
The United Nations Buildup
244
North Africa Cleared of the Axis
258
Motor Torpedo Boat Operations
261

The Winning of Algiers 815 November 1942
188
The Landings
198
b Groups Apples and Beer Land West of Algiers c H M S Broke and Malcolm Attempt a Frontal Attack d Diplomacy Ashore
203
The Thomas Stone Flotilla
209
Air Raids 815 November
212
Politics Again
214
a PT Background b Operations of Squadron 15
265
Arrival of the New Landing Ships
266
Pantelleria
275
Allied Ships Sunk in Operation
283
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About the author (2001)

Samuel Eliot Morison was born in Boston in 1887. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1912 and began teaching history there in 1915, becoming full professor in 1925 and Jonathan Trumbull professor of American history in 1941. He served as the university's official historian and wrote a three-volume history of the institution, the Tercentennial History of Harvard College and University, which was completed in 1936. Between 1922 and 1925 he was Harmsworth professor of American history at Oxford. He also was an accomplished sailor who retired from the navy in 1951 as a rear admiral. In preparing for his Pulitzer Prize-winning biographies of Christopher Columbus and John Paul Jones, Admiral of the Ocean Sea (1941) and John Paul Jones: A Sailor's Biography (1952) he took himself out of the study and onto the high seas, where he traced the voyages of his subjects and "lived" their stories insofar as possible. When it came time for the U.S. Navy to select an author to write a history of its operations in World War II, Morison was the natural choice for the task. In 1942, Morison was commissioned by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt to write a history of U.S. naval operations in World War II and given the rank of lieutenant commander. The 15 volumes of his History of United States Naval Operations in World War II appeared between 1947 and 1962. Although he retired from Harvard in 1955, Morison continued his research and writing. A product of the Brahmin tradition, Morison wrote about Bostonians and other New Englanders and about life in early Massachusetts. He was an "American historian" in the fullest sense of the term. He also had a keen appreciation for the larger history of the nation and world, provincial is the last word one would use to describe Morison's writing.

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