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Of each new hatch'd, unfledg’d comrade. Beware
Of entrance to a quarrel : but, being in,
Bear it that the opposer may beware of thee.
Give

every man thine ear, but few thy voice: 'ake each man's censure 14, but reserve thy judg

ment. 'ostly thy habit as thy purse can buy, Sut not express'd in fancy; rich, not gaudy: 'or the apparel oft proclaims the man: Ind they in France, of the best rank and station, Are most select and generous, chief 15 in that. Veither a borrower, nor a lender be: for loan oft loses both itself and friend; Ind borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry 16. Chis above all,—To thine ownself be true; And it must follow, as the night the day, Chou canst not then be false to any man. Carewell; my blessing season 17 this in thee! 14 i.e. judgment, opinion ; censura, Lat. Thus in King Henry VI. Part 11.:

* The king is old enough to give his censure.' 15 The quarto of 1603 reads :

Are of a most select and generall chief in this.' l'he folio:

*Are of a most select and generous cheff, in that.' The other quartos give the line :

As of a most select and generous, cheefe in that.'

Or of a most select and generous, cheefe in that.' Malone has tried to torture the passage into a meaning, by supposing an allusion to the chief or upper part of a shield in heraldry. But the redundancy of the line, and discrepancy of the copies, evidently show it to be corrupt. The simple emendation by omitting of a, and the proper punctuation of the line, make all clear. The nobility of France are most select and high-minded (generosus) chiefly in that;' chief being an adjective used adverbially. We have generous for high minded, noble, in Othello, and in Measure for Measure.

16 i.e. thrift, economical prudence.

17. To season, for to infuse,' says Warburton. It is more than to infuse, it is to infix in such a manner that it may never

Himself the primrose path of dalliance treads,
And recks not his own read 10.
Laer.

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Of each new hatch'd, unfledg’d comrade. Beware
Of entrance to a quarrel : but, being in,
Bear it that the opposer may beware of thee.
Give

every man thine ear, but few thy voice: Take each man’s censure 14, but reserve thy judg

ment. Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy, But not express’d in fancy; rich, not gaudy: For the apparel oft proclaims the man: And they in France, of the best rank and station, Are most select and generous, chief 15 in that. Neither a borrower, nor a lender be: For loan oft loses both itself and friend; And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry 16. This above all, -To thine ownself be true; And it must follow, as the night the day, Thou canst not then be false to any man. Farewell; my blessing season 17 this in thee!

i.e.

e. judgment, opinion; censura, Lat. Thus in King Henry VI. Part Il.:

• The king is old enough to give his censure.' 15 The quarto of 1603 reads :

*Are of a most select and generall chief in this.' The folio:

• Are of a most select and generous cheff, in that.' The other quartos give the line :

As of a most select and generous, cheefe in that.'

Or of a most select and generous, cheefe in that.' Malone has tried to torture the passage into a meaning, by supposing an allusion to the chief or upper part of a shield in heraldry. But the redundancy of the line, and discrepancy of the copies, evidently show it to be corrupt. The simple emendation by omitting of a, and the proper punctuation of the line, make all clear. The nobility of France are most select and high-minded (generosus) chiefly in that;' chief being an adjective used adverbially. We have generous for high minded, noble, in Othello, and in Measure for Measure.

16 i.e. thrift, economical prudence.
17 · To season, for to infuse,' says Warburton.

• It is more than to infuse, it is to infix in such a manner that it may never

14

Laer. Most humbly do I take my leave, my lord.
Pol. The time invites you; go, your servants

tend 18.
Laer. Farewell, Ophelia; and remember well
What I have said to you.
Oph.

'Tis in my memory lock'd, And you yourself shall keep the key of it. Laer. Farewell.

[Exit LAERTES. Pol. What is't, Ophelia, he hath said to you? Oph. So please you, something touching the lord

Hamlet. Pol. Marry, well bethought: 'Tis told me, he hath very oft of late Given private time to you; and you yourself Have of your audience been most free and bounteous: If it be so (as so ʼtis put on me, And that in way of caution), I must tell you, You do not understand yourself so clearly, As it behoves my daughter, and your honour: What is between you? give me up the truth.

Oph. He hath, my lord, of late, made many tenders Of his affection to me.

Pol. Affection ? puh! you speak like a green girl, Unsifted 19 in such perilous circumstance. Do

you believe his tenders, as you call them? Oph. I do not know, my lord, what I should think.

Pol. Marry, I'll teach you: think yourself a baby; That you

have ta'en these tenders for true pay,

wear out,' says Johnson. But hear one of the poet's cotemporaries :—' To season, to temper wisely, to make more pleasant and acceptable.'— Baret. This is the sense required, and is a better commentary than the conjectures of the learned critics, Warburton and Johnson, could supply. Thus in Act ii. Sc. 1, Polonius says to Reynaldo, 'You may season it in the charge. And in a former scene Horatio says:

Season your admiration for a while.'

19 i, e, untried, inexperienced.

18 Wait.

Which are not sterling. Tender yourself more dearly; Or (not to crack the wind of the poor phrase, Wronging it thus), you'll tender me a fool 20.

Oph. My lord, he hath importun'd me with love, In honourable fashion 21.

Pol. Ay, fashion you may call it; go to, go to. Oph. And hath given countenance to his speech,

my lord,

24

20

With almost all the holy vows of heaven.
Pol. Ay, springes to catch woodcocks 22. I do

know,
When the blood burns, how prodigal the soul
Lends the tongue vows 23: these blazes, daughter,
Giving more light than heat,-extinct in both,
Even in their promise, as it is a making,
You must not take for fire. From this time,
Be somewhat scanter of

your
maiden

presence; Set

your entreatments at a higher rate,
Than a command to parley. For lord Hamlet,
Believe so much in him, That he is young;
And with a larger tether 25 may he walk,

Shakspeare makes Polonius play on the equivocal use of the word tender, which was anciently used in the sense of regard or respect, as well as in that of offer. The folio reads, roaming it thus ;' and the quarto, ‘wrong it thus.'

21 Ophelia uses fashion for manner; and Polonius equivocates upon the word, taking it in its usual acceptation, for a transient practice.

22 This was a proverbial phrase. There is a collection of epigrams under that title : the woodcock being accounted a witless bird, from a vulgar notion that it had no brains. 'Springes to catch woodcocks' means ' arts to entrap simplicity.'

23 • How prodigal the tongue lends the heart vows,'4to. 1603.

24 i. e. ' be more difficult of access, and let the suits to you for that purpose be of higher respect, than a command to parley.' How Jobnson could conceive entreatments to signify company, conversation, I am at a loss to imagine.

25 i. e. with a longer line ; a horse fastened by a string to a stake, is tethered: figuratively with more licence.

VOL. X.

S

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