Frankenstein: Or, the Modern Prometheus; Vol. I

Front Cover
Bibliolife DBA of Bibilio Bazaar II LLC, Jul 20, 2017 - 194 pages

Nineteenth Century Collections Online: European Literature, 1790-1840: The Corvey Collection includes the full-text of more than 9,500 English, French and German titles. The collection is sourced from the remarkable library of Victor Amadeus, whose Castle Corvey collection was one of the most spectacular discoveries of the late 1970s. The Corvey Collection comprises one of the most important collections of Romantic era writing in existence anywhere -- including fiction, short prose, dramatic works, poetry, and more -- with a focus on especially difficult-to-find works by lesser-known, historically neglected writers.

The Corvey library was built during the last half of the 19th century by Victor and his wife Elise, both bibliophiles with varied interests. The collection thus contains everything from novels and short stories to belles lettres and more populist works, and includes many exceedingly rare works not available in any other collection from the period. These invaluable, sometimes previously unknown works are of particular interest to scholars and researchers.

European Literature, 1790-1840: The Corvey Collection includes:

* Novels and Gothic Novels
* Short Stories
* Belles-Lettres
* Short Prose Forms
* Dramatic Works
* Poetry
* Anthologies
* And more

Selected with the guidance of an international team of expert advisors, these primary sources are invaluable for a wide range of academic disciplines and areas of study, providing never before possible research opportunities for one of the most studied historical periods.

Additional Metadata

Primary Id: B0184001
PSM Id: NCCOF0063-C00000-B0184001
DVI Collection Id: NCCOC0062
Bibliographic Id: NCCO001723
Reel: 632
MCODE: 4UVC
Original Publisher: Printed for Lackington, Hughes, Harding, Mavor & Jones
Original Publication Year: 1818
Original Imprint Manufacturer: Printed by Macdonald and Son


Variant Titles

Modern Prometheus


Subjects

English fiction -- 19th century.

What people are saying - Write a review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - birdie.newborn - LibraryThing

An important book. Mary Shelley is methodical, but also swept up in the Sturm-und-Drang emotionality of the period. Her characters have motivations, psychological depth, passions. Read full review

Other editions - View all

About the author (2017)

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was born in England on August 30, 1797. Her parents were two celebrated liberal thinkers, William Godwin, a social philosopher, and Mary Wollstonecraft, a women's rights advocate. Eleven days after Mary's birth, her mother died of puerperal fever. Four motherless years later, Godwin married Mary Jane Clairmont, bringing her and her two children into the same household with Mary and her half-sister, Fanny. Mary's idolization of her father, his detached and rational treatment of their bond, and her step-mother's preference for her own children created a tense and awkward home. Mary's education and free-thinking were encouraged, so it should not surprise us today that at the age of sixteen she ran off with the brilliant, nineteen-year old and unhappily married Percy Bysshe Shelley. Shelley became her ideal, but their life together was a difficult one. Traumas plagued them: Shelley's wife and Mary's half-sister both committed suicide; Mary and Shelley wed shortly after he was widowed but social disapproval forced them from England; three of their children died in infancy or childhood; and while Shelley was an aristocrat and a genius, he was also moody and had little money. Mary conceived of her magnum opus, Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus, when she was only nineteen when Lord Byron suggested they tell ghost stories at a house party. The resulting book took over two years to write and can be seen as the brilliant creation of a powerful but tormented mind. The story of Frankenstein has endured nearly two centuries and countless variations because of its timeless exploration of the tension between our quest for knowledge and our thirst for good. Shelley drowned when Mary was only 24, leaving her with an infant and debts. She died from a brain tumor on February 1, 1851 at the age of 54.

Bibliographic information