A Political Index to the Histories of Great Britain & Ireland, Or, a Complete Register of the Hereditary Honours, Public Offices, and Persons in Office: From the Earliest Periods to the Present Time, Volume 1

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, 1806 - Great Britain
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Page 316 - The oath of office consists of six parts : "1. That well and truly he shall serve our Sovereign Lord the King and his people in the office of Chancellor 2. That he shall do right to all manner of people, poor and rich, after the laws and usages of the realm. 3. That he shall truly counsel the King, and his counsel he shall layne 1 and keep.
Page 6 - Counsellors. Chancellor of the Exchequer. Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench. Master of the Rolls. Lord Chief Justice of the Common Pleas. Lord Chief Baron of the Exchequer. Judges and Barons of the degree of the Coif of the said Courts, according to Seniority.
Page 2 - His parliamentaryrobe is of fine scarlet cloth, lined with taffeta, and doubled with four guards of ermine at equal distances, with gold lace above each guard, and is tied up to the left shoulder with white ribbon.
Page 349 - By stat. 21, Henry VIII., he is to attend the King's person ; to manage the debates in Council ; to propose matters from the King at the Council ; and to report to the King the resolutions thereupon. The Treasury.
Page 4 - Vavasour, which, by the Saxons was changed into Thane, and by the Normans into Baron. Many of this rank are named in the history of England, and undoubtedly had assisted...
Page 156 - At coronations, he places the crown on the king's head ; and, whereevcr the court may be, the king and queen are the proper domestic parishioners of the archbishop of Canterbury.
Page 165 - Wells, in 10ИЯ ; and from this, disputes arose between the monks of Bath and the canons of Wells, about the election of a bishop; but they were...
Page 361 - Marshal ; and further, gave them power to bear in their hand a gold truncheon, enamelled with black at each end ; having at the upper end of it the King's arms engraved thereon, and at the lower end his own arms.
Page 7 - ... by which any man convicted of making a scandalous report against a peer of the realm (though true) is condemned to an arbitrary fine, and to remain in custody till the same be paid.
Page 2 - March, which, in the language of the northern nations, is a limit or bound, and their office was to guard or govern the frontiers of a province. It has the next place of honour to a duke, and was introduced several years after that title had been established, in England. The first on whom it was conferred, was the great favourite of king Richard II., Robert...

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