Page images
PDF
EPUB
[ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small]
[merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small]

AUT SIMUL ET JUCUNDA ET IDONEA DICERE VITÆ.

Hor. de Art. Poët.

VOL. V.

LONDON.

PRINTED FOR G. ROBERTSON, NO. 221, PICCADILLY; J. CUTHELL

NO. 24, MIDDLE-ROW, HOL BORN; AND MISSRS. BELL
BRADEFUTE, EDINBURGH.

AND

1793•

[ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small]

TO THE

· EARL OF WHARTON.*

1712-13.

MY LORD,

THE Author of the Spectator baving prefixed before each of bis volumes the name of some great person to wbom be bas particular obligations, lays bis claim to your Lordsbip's patronage upon the same account. I

must

A 2

.

* THOMAS WHARTON was appointed by King WILLIAM Comptroller of the Household, Justice in Eyre South of Trent, and Lord Lieutenant of Oxfordshire; created Viscount Winchen Don and Earl of WHARTON, Dec. 23, 1706; appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, in 1709.

He took Mr. ADDISON with him as his Secretary. Adhering to the Whig interest, he lost his employment-strenuously opposed the machinations of OXFORD and BOLINGBROKE. On the accession of King George, he was made Lord Privy Seal, Sept. 24, 1714; and Dec. 24, Marquis of WHARTON and MALMESBURY, in England; and Earl of RATHPARNHAM, and Marquis CATHER LOUGH, in Ireland. He died April 12, 1715, in the 76th year of his age. He was suc. ceeded by his son Philip, whom King GEORGE 1. in 1718 Created Duke of WHARTON, purely in consideration of the merits of his noble father, as appears' from the patent of his creation, must confess, my Lord, had not I already received great in: stances of your favour, I should bave been afraid of submitting a work of this nature to your perusal. You are so tborougbly acquainted with the characters of men, and all the parts of buman life, that it is impossible for tbc least misrepresentation of them to escape your notice. It is your Lordship's particular distinction that you are master of the wbole compass of business, and bave signalized yourself in all the different scenes of it. We admire some for the dignity, others for the popularity of tbeir bebaviour ; some for tbeir clearness of judgment, otbers for their bappiness of expression; some for the laying of schemes, and others for the putting of them in execution. It is your Lordship only who enjoys these several talents united, and that too in as great perfection as others possess them singly. Your enemies acknowledge this great extent in your Lordsbip's character, at ibe same time that they use their utmost industry and invention to derogato from it. But it is for your bonour that those who are now your enemies were always so. You have acted in so much consistency with yourself, and promoted the interests of your country in so uniform a manner, that even those zebo would misreprescut your generous designs for the

which

public

which mentions“ King WILLIAM's obligations to Lord WHARTON for his constant and vigorc-:s defence of the public liberty, and the Protestant religion ;” and states,

“how vigorously he supported the interest of King George, by the weight of his counsels, the force of his wit, and the firmness of his mind, when his said Majesty's title to the succession to this realm was in danger." An eminent historian says, “ he had as many friend, as the constitution, and that only its enemies were his; that he made no merit of his zeal for his country; and that he expendest above 80,cool, for its service.”

« PreviousContinue »