The Edinburgh magazine, or Literary miscellany

Front Cover
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 195 - And, behold, the LORD passed by, and a great and strong wind rent the mountains, and brake in pieces the rocks before the LORD ; but the LORD was not in the wind: and after the wind an earthquake; but the LORD was not in the earthquake: and after the earthquake a fire; but the LORD was not in the fire: and after the fire a still small voice.
Page 368 - The officers and men being in the boat, they only waited for me, of which the master-at-arms informed Christian, who then said, 'Come, Captain Bligh, your officers and men are now in the boat, and you must go with them; if you attempt to make the least resistance you will instantly be put to death...
Page 250 - The whole import of the word they did not perfectly understand, but they had heard something about standing in a church, and a penance, and their ideas immediately ran upon a white sheet. They concluded, if they once got into that, it was all over with them ; and as the excommunication was to take place the next day, away they hurried to Mr. Elwes, to know how they could make submission, and how the sentence might be prevented.
Page 227 - AN ACCOUNT OF THE PRINCIPAL LAZARETTOS IN EUROPE; with various papers relative to the Plague: together with further Observations on some Foreign Prisons and Hospitals; and additional Remarks on the present State of those in Great Britain and Ireland.
Page 228 - ... Should it please God to cut off my life in the prosecution of this design, let not my conduct be uncandidly imputed to rashness or enthusiasm, but to a serious, deliberate conviction that I am pursuing the path of duty, and to a sincere desire of being made an instrument of more extensive usefulness to my fellowcreatures than could be expected in the narrower circle of a retired life.
Page 262 - There is a peculiarity belonging to ravens that must draw the attention even of the most incurious— they spend all their leisure time in striking and cuffing each other on the wing in a kind of playful skirmish; and when they move from one place to another, frequently turn on their backs with a loud croak, and seem to be falling to the ground. When this odd gesture betides them, they are scratching themselves with one foot, and thus lose the centre of gravity.
Page 313 - In the villages near Banares, it is the practice for the person, who is to be tried by this kind of ordeal, to stand in water up to his navel, and then, holding the foot of a Brahman, to dive under it as long as a man can walk fifty paces very gently ; if, before the man has walked thus far, the accused rise above the water, he is condemned ; if not, acquitted.
Page 279 - From minds thus subdued by the terrors of punishment there could issue no works of genius to expand the empire of human reason, nor any masterly compositions on the general nature of government, by the help of which the great commonwealths of mankind have founded their establishments; much less any...
Page 195 - And, behold, the Lord passed by, and a great and strong wind rent the mountains, and brake in pieces the rocks before the Lord; but the Lord was not in the wind: and after the wind an earthquake; but the Lord was not in the earthquake: and after the earthquake a fire; but the Lord was not in the fire: and after the fire a still small voice.
Page 309 - He, one day, during this period, dined upon the remaining part of a moor-hen, which had been brought out of the river by a rat! and at another, eat an...

Bibliographic information