The Spectator ...

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Page 37 - Did not I weep for him that was in trouble ? was not my soul grieved for the poor?
Page 60 - Pleasure and Pain were no sooner met in their new habitation, but they immediately agreed upon this point, that Pleasure should take possession of the virtuous, and Pain of the vicious part of that species which was given up to them. But upon examining to which of them any individual they met with belonged, they found each of them had a right to him ; for that, contrary...
Page 255 - Alcseus, the famous lyric poet, who had for some time been passionately in love with Sappho, arrived at the promontory of Leucate that very evening, in order to take the leap upon her account; but hearing that Sappho had been there before him, and that her body could be no where found, he very generously lamented her fall, and is said to have written his hundred and twenty-fifth ode upon that occasion.
Page 222 - The first part of this rule, which regards our behaviour towards an enemy, is indeed very reasonable, as well as very prudential ; but the latter part of it, which regards our behaviour towards a friend, savours...
Page 213 - I do not know by the character that is given of her works, whether it is not for the benefit of mankind that they are lost. They were filled with such bewitching tenderness and rapture, that it might have been dangerous to have given them a reading.
Page 21 - And at best, let frugality and parsimony be the virtues of the merchant, how much is his punctual dealing below a gentleman's charity to the poor, or hospitality among his neighbours...
Page 37 - Because I delivered the poor that cried, And the fatherless, and him that had none to help him. The blessing of him that, was ready to perish came upon me: And I caused the widow's heart to sing for joy. I put on righteousness, and it clothed me: My judgment was as a robe and a diadem. I was eyes to the blind, And feet was I to the lame. I was a father to the poor: And the cause which I knew not I searched out.
Page 163 - How can he exalt his thoughts to any thing great and noble, who only believes that, after a short turn on the stage of this world, he is to sink into oblivion, and to lose his consciousness...
Page 89 - The man who will live above his present circumstances, is in great danger of living in a little time much beneath them ; or, as the Italian proverb runs, The Man who lives by Hope will die by Hunger.
Page 198 - ... meanest and most insignificant part of mankind endeavour to procure in the little circle of their friends and acquaintance. The poorest mechanic, nay, the man who lives upon common alms, gets him his set of admirers, and delights in that superiority which he enjoys over those who are in some respects beneath him. This ambition, which is natural to the soul of man, might...

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