The Political State of the British Empire: Containing a General View of the Domestic and Foreign Possessions of the Crown; the Laws, Commerce, Revenues, Offices, and Other Establishments, Civil and Military, Volume 2

Front Cover
T. Cadell and W. Davies, 1818 - Great Britain
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 560 - A crime, or misdemeanor, is an act committed or omitted in violation of a public law, either forbidding or commanding it.
Page 705 - LASTLY, extortion is an abuse of public justice, which consists in any officer's unlawfully taking, by colour of his office, from any man, any money or thing of value, that is not due to him, or more than is due, or before it is due ". The punishment is fine and imprisonment, and sometimes a forfeiture of the office.
Page 469 - ... its jurisdiction extends to administer justice for all commercial injuries done in that very fair or market, and not in any preceding one. So that the injury must be done, complained of, heard, and determined, within the compass of one and the same day, unless the fair continues longer.
Page 488 - Equity is a Roguish thing, for Law we have a measure, know what to trust to, Equity is according to the Conscience of him that is Chancellor, and as that is larger or narrower, so is Equity. 'Tis all one as if they should make the Standard for the measure, we call [a Foot] a Chancellor's Foot, what an uncertain Measure would this be?
Page 708 - ... upon the whole matter put in issue upon the indictment or information, and shall not be required or directed by the court or judge before whom it shall be tried to find the defendant guilty merely on the proof of the publication of the paper charged to be a libel and of the sense ascribed to the same in the indictment or information.
Page 704 - Champerty is a species of maintenance and punished in the- same manner ; being a bargain with a plaintiff or defendant, campum partire, to divide the land or other matter sued for between them, if they prevail at law : whereupon the champertor is to carry on the party's suit at his own expense.
Page 281 - The necessity of order and discipline in an army is the only thing which can give it countenance, and therefore it ought not to be permitted in time of peace, when the King's Courts are open for all persons to receive justice according to the laws of the land.
Page 555 - And herein they state the naked facts, as they find them to be proved, and pray the advice of the court thereon; concluding conditionally, that if upon the whole matter the court should be of opinion that the plaintiff had cause of action, they then find for the plaintiff; if otherwise, then for the defendant.
Page 579 - King, his heirs and successors, or to deprive or depose him or them from the style, honour, or kingly name of the imperial crown of this realm, or of any other of His Majesty's dominions or countries, or to levy war against His...
Page 546 - A piece of ground is then in due time set out, of sixty feet square, enclosed with lists, and on one side a court erected for the judges of the court of common pleas, who attend there in their scarlet robes ; and also a bar is prepared for the learned Serjeants at law.

Bibliographic information