The Architecture of Paris: An Architectural Guide

Front Cover
Edition Axel Menges, 2004 - Architecture - 415 pages
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When not directly shaping the fabric of Paris themselves, its rulers have always kept tight control over the activities of others, with the result that Paris has developed under some of the strictest building regulations of any major city. Despite Paris's much vaunted reputation as the cultural salon of Europe, a certain suspicion towards foreign architectural imports has characterised its development, and outside influences have always been adapted to local needs and indigenous modes of expression, a tradition which carried on until the post-war era and arguably continues today. The last decades of the 20th century have witnessed a rush to modernise and adapt a crumbling fabric to the exigencies of the electronic age.
 

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Contents

Foreword
7
2nd arrondissement
56
3rd arrondissement
64
4th arrondissement
76
5th arrondissement
103
6th arrondissement
120
7th arrondissement
134
8th arrondissement
151
14th arrondissement
216
15th arrondissement
227
16th arrondissement
236
17th arrondissement
254
19th arrondissement
266
20th arrondissement
281
The Metropolitain and
381
Seine bridges
390

9th arrondissement
164
10th arrondissement
177
11th arrondissement
183
13th arrondissement
201
Parisian housing 14001900
396
Selected bibliograpy
404
Photo credits
416
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Andrew Ayers studied at the Bartlett School of Architecture and Planning, University College London, and now lives in Paris.

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