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(p. 233 A, or in Wyttenbach's ed., Oxon, 1795, pictures noticed in the article on Carter in the 8vo., vol. i. p. 929. The above words, which have Dict of Nat. Biog. Can any one inform me become proverbial, I have introduced into the where the original of Carter's picture of the Farmer following version of Wordsworth's two lines : action is ? 0, cuckoo ! shall I call thee bird,

In looking at the seventeenth volume of the Or but a wandering voice ?

' Dict. of Nat. Biog.' the other day I noticed, s.v. 0, cucule, an volucris tu diceris ? anne vagaris Elliott, William—that this painter also chose for

Tu passim mera vox, prætereaque nihil ? the subject of one of his pictures The Action Some aspirant for the academical honour of the between H.M.S. Quebec and Le Surveillant,' and Hertford or Ireland will, I hope, furnish the Alcaic this picture was exhibited at the Royal Academy or Sapphic desiderated in pure Augustan, after a in 1789. A similiar companion picture by him, careful study of the fifth fable of Ovid's 'Meta- entitled 'The Action between H.M.S. Serapis and morphoses,' iii. 350-400, the story of Narcissus Le Bonhomme,' was exhibited at the same time. and Echo, which may be suggestive of some Elliott was a lieutenant in the Royal Navy and a felicitous turns of expression.

marine painter, and “gained some repute from his In the General Index to the First Series of paintings of naval actions between 1780 and 1790." 'N. & Q.,' p. 108, add to the references given He died at Leeds on July 21, 1792, and was a after “ Vox et præterea nihil,” 419.

captain at the time of his death. What is known W. E. BOCKLEY. of these two pictures ? Are the originals trace

able ? Have they, or either of them, been enThe vague sense of vaga makes it, obviously, an

graved ? If so, by whom, and where can the enimperfect rendering of “wandering," as applied to gravings be seen? Did Elliott depict the same a voice. But the same objection would hardly incident in the action as Carter ? These actions apply, I venture to think, to vagula or vagans. In music we find, for other reasons, the latter used seem to have been favourite subjects with the as a name for the “Quinta Vox”

in old madrigals

, painters of the time in which they were fought, where it was not restricted by rule to a particular been immortalized by any other painters, either

Is it known wbether they have register, but wandered at the will of the composer. contemporary or since ? Perhaps some of those There was, however, nothing doubtful about it when once set down. JULIAN MARSHALL,

correspondents who were kind enough to reply to

my previous query may be able and willing to give Do not Wordsworth's own stanzas meet the me some information on the above questions, point of this query? Vagus or vervagus, applied

A relative of mine has recently bought an ento the cuckoo's notes, would be no more, if no graving of Capt. Farmer's portrait by Murphy after less, obscure in meaning to the ancient Roman Charles Grignion, jun., similar to the one menthan "wandering” would have been to the modern tioned in my former query. It was displayed in a Briton, in the absence of further explanation in printseller's window as 'Amiral Americain ou either case ; but Wordsworth's stanzas have ex- Anglais,' and was obtained for a small price, thanks piained the term for the latter :

to the inability of the vendor to identify it. Perhaps From hill to hill it seems to pass,

the fact that the original was exhibited at the Royal At once far off and near ;

Academy in 1778 as 'A Naval Officer' may and any Latin rendering of the poem would account for the description. The engraving was equally supply the ancient Roman with that ex termed a “Belle epreuve avant la lettre," which I planation.

T'HOMAS J. Ewing. suppose implies that it is an original proof before Warwick,

the name was added.

ALPHA. Capt. George FARMER (6th S. ii. 467, 522; iii.

POUNDS (7th S. vi. 408 ; vii. 31). —There is & 237; 70 S. iv. 409, 473, 537).-In the above pound after the orthodox Pickwickian pattern a references I have included those notes which mile from Ealing, on the highway to Uxbridge, appeared in the Sixth Series under the heading of and a short time ago I saw a horse and a donkey

Navel Duel,' as they all relate to Capt. Farmer. in melancholy companionship therein.
My note chiefly concerns the engravings of the

Joseph BEARD. naval action fought by Capt. Farmer. At the first

Ealing. reference the engraving is correctly stated to have been after a picture by George Carter, who

Cantlin STONE (7th S. iv. 109, 258).— I find this flourished 1737 to 1794. The picture is entitled explained. “ rocking stone "; but query cromlech, * The Quebec engaging the Surveillante,' and was

i. e., the “bowed” stone ; distinct from a boulder engraved by James Caldwell (b. 1739). Neither or bowder, because of artificial construction. this picture nor the companion picture mentioned

A. H. by MR. PICKFORD—'The Serapis engaging the Bon MERCURY (7th S. vi. 448, 497; vii. 55).- The Homme Richard' - is enumerated amongst bis plant dog's mercury is the Mercurialis perennis, so

named from its producing salivation and the other Sea, a mountainous country, in the recesses of which the well-known effects of mercury on the canine ophthoi, or monks of paganism, the Christian recluses species.

A. H. BARTLETT.

of St. Anthony and St. Paul, and the Roman convicts who were condemned to the marble quarries, existed century after century. Meanwhile, during fifteen hun

dred years much of the trade between Europe and the fiscellaneous.

East traversed the passes to and from Coptos and the seas NOTES ON BOOKS, &o.

on the north and east. But the crowning interest of this

region exists in the ancient and, for more than seventeen Lives of Twelve Good Men. By John William Burgon, hundred years, deserted quarries, where countless slaves,

B.D., Dean of Chichester.. 2 vols. (Murray.)
As “a lover of good men," and one that would not byses and Darius wrote their names upon the cliff-like

captives, and criminals were slain by labour before Camwillingly let the odour of their lives be lost to posterity, sides of the prodigious Hammamat excavation of sandDean Burgon has embalmed the memory of twelve stone which is still a wonder of the world. At Porworthies personally known to himself in these two inter-phyrites blocks lie so bard that a fragment will cut esting volumes. They come to us with pathetic a880 glass. At Mons Claudianus lie many cylinders weighing ciations, as having only left the hands of their pious two hundred tong each, and shaped with exquisite author in his dying moments. He did not live to see their issue from the press; and, as if prescient of the accuracy: of the antique quarries the last lease was

granted to Epaphroditos, imperial freedman, A.D. 147. fact, he closes his prelace with the touching remark There has been no other lessee till Mr. Brindley set to that a friend lately lost "sleeps—where I shall soon

work at this place. How he went by the route of Roman myself be sleeping-in Holywell cemetery."

commerce; how, often toiling amid remains of antique Dean Burgon defines his aim in this work as an attempt quarrying, vast slides for ponderous masses of stone to be to show that biographies might with advantage be con.

let down, and stations for guards and labourers, he digfined within narrower limits than they usually are, and covered a prodigious quantity of the porphyry he was in at the same time exhibit their subjects in such a way search of, the reader must learn for himself. The tbat future generations may think that they had seen architect and geologist will profit by Mr, Brindley's and known them. This aim he has fully succeeded in energy. From bim they may hear of the alabaster of the realizing. His lives are vivid portraits of the men as ancients, and of their porphyry, granite, diorite, syenite they lived and spoke and acted, their peculiarities of (statuary and building materials of the Egyptians),

sandlook and manner, of voice and gesture being presented, stone (breaking up of which has supplied materials for often with

a good deal of dry humour, so that we almost the desert), limestone (which outlasts granite), and many seem to have enjoyed their

personal acquaintance. The conglomerates. He purposes to supply us with the three which will probably interest the largest number of veritable imperial porphyry (which the emperors absoreaders are the sketches of the venerable Dr. Routh, lutely monopolized) at the price of granite, and worked u the learned divine”-a very full one; Henry John like that material. After this any Briton's son may be Rose, to whom more than any other one man, Dr. Bur. born in a porphyry chamber, as were the Porphyrogeniti gon thinks, is to be assigned the honour of having of Byzantium, and our County Councils may try to originated that great revival in the Church of England make us pay for porphyry columns like Constantine's, known as the Oxford Movement; and Samael Wilber- which was one hundred feet high. This volume is force, the model bishop. The notice of Dr. Routh, as a further devoted to useful papers on the Recent Devesurvival into our own times of a generation long gone by; lopment of Vienna,''

Masonry for Students,' an éloge on affords an opportunity for depicting the manners and

the late Mr. Beresford Hope, Viollet-le-Duc' (comcustoms of Oxford as it was in a digression which is prising a noble testimony to a wonderful man, who was exceedingly quaint and amusing. We have here the worthy of the laudari a laudatis which has been his lot), locus classicus (vol. i. p. 73) for the often-quoted story Illuminants and Ventilation' (a highly practicablo about the quintessential axiom which the aged President paper), The Temple of Jupiter Olympius (by Mr. of Magdalen drew out of his lifelong literary experience, F. E."Penrose), "On Legal Decisions affecting Archi. “Always verify your references, sir.". It was in response tects' (by Mr. F. M. White), “Mogul Art in the India to a request of young Burgon that this invaluable pre- Museum, A Tour in Provence and Languedoc (rich in cept was formulated. These records of nineteenth cen intelligent notes and sketches), ‘A Tour in Italy' (of tury saints, as edifying in matter as they are attractive which the same may be said), a capital . Prize Essay on in their manner, are worthy to stand on the same shelf Church Planning,' and 'Sculpture in its relation to with Izaak Walton's charming Lives' and the eccle- Architecture,' with an introduction by Mr. G. Aitchison. siastical biographies of Christopher Wordsworth; and Dean Burgon, sound and typical churchman as he was, The Floating Island in Derwentwater, its History and would desire (we imagine) no better commendation for

Mystery, with Notes of other Dissimilar Islands. By his book than that.

G. J. Symons, F.R.S. (Stanford.) Transactions of the Royal Institute of British Architects. This little book gives an account of the circumstances Vol. IV. New Series. (R.I.B.A.)

relating to the curious phenomenon that near the southALTHOUGH the series of which this is the latest member eastern shore of Lake Derwentwater a small island, or has been distinguished by many a searching essay, rather three little islets (the westernmost of which is. thoughtful narrative, and pregnant history, it has never the largest, being about forty feet by thirty in extent, been more fortunate than in the present instance, which and its western side about 480 feet distant from the includes a valuable paper by one competent to deal with shore), appear at irregular intervals, about once in four a subject in which" (whether by commercial energy or years, floating on the surface of the water, and ro. success in exploration the more happily it would be hard maining so for about a month. The mass of matter to say) he is a master. Mr. Brindley has brought into composing them is at other times at the bottom of the modern vogue marble used in antiquity, e.g., giallo lake. When elevated, the upper part is from six to antico and rosso antico, as at the National Gallery and eighteen inches above the level of the water, and covered the New Gallery. He has furnished an account of his with aquatic vegetation. The peculiarity of these as journey across the desert between the Nile and the Red compared with other floating islands (of which Mr.

Symons mentions a few taken from ancient and modern which trigonometry is concerned. He also gives in it a authors) is the fact of their occasional instead of per complete bibliography of the various editions of Napier's manent appearance. The earliest account of them

which works, with the names of the principal public libraries Mr. Symons has been able to discover is 1773, by which possess copies. Messrs. Blackwood are the pubHutchinson, author of the History of the County of lishers. Cumberland,' which was published in 1794. The view (now known to be erroneous) is there expressed that the tion of The Bacon-Shakspere Question, answered by C.

MESSRS. TRUBNER & Co. have published a second edi. island does not float, but simply appears above water

Stopes. when the level of the lake is low. Sir G. B. Airy (late Astronomer Royal) made some careful observations of it The First Part of Henry IV. Edited by 0. Elton. in the autumn of 1876, and thought it probable " that (Rivingtons.) -- An admirable little edition of the

play there is a depression of the lake bottom at the place for educational purposes. where the Aoating island appears." It can hardly be doubted that the mass is caused to float by the formation UNDER the authority of the Corporation of Gloucester, of gases in its interstices, which render at times its 'A Calendar of the Corporation Records' will, by subspecific gravity somewhat less than that of water ; and scription, be issued in two volumes, in an edition limited this view has been well expressed by Dr. Alexander to 300 copies, of which fifty are on large paper. The Knight, of Keswick, But more complete knowledge publication will be under the eminently competent respecting the special conditions which lead to the editorship of Mr. W. H. Stevenson and the Rev. Wm. formation of these gases in such a way as to produce the Bazeley. effect in question would be of great interest; and Mr.

MESSRE. SOTHEBY,

WILKINSON & HODGE will begin on Symons has published this interesting little volume for Monday a four days' sale of the Hopetoun Library. This the purpose of calling attention to the subject and fine library includes bindings by Clovis Eve, and many eliciting further information with regard to it.

books and MSS. of the kind which appeal most directly The Archæological Review, Vol. I. (Nutt.) to collectors, We are now able to take a fair view of the work which Mr. G. L. Gomme and his fellow-labourers are seeking

Potices to Correspondents. to accomplish, and we are glad to find that the new

We must call special attention to the following notices : review bids fair to hold its own with good promise of usefulness in the field of scientific archaeological research. address of the sender, not necessarily for publication, but

On all communications must be written the name and We hope that everything will not be settled off-hand by a reference to totemism, or to exogamy and endogamy.

as a guarantee of good faith. Sir Henry Maine's warnings on this latter point, in his

We cannot undertake to answer queries privately. * Early Law and Custom, deserve more attention than To secure ingertion of communications correspondents they receive, as do also his warnings, in the same work, must observe the following rule, Let each note, query, on the evidence alleged for customs among savage races, or reply be written on a separate slip of paper, with the Mr. Gomme bas himself been too confiding, we cannot signature of the writer and such address as he wishes to but think, in accepting as an old Scottish custom an appear. Correspondents who repeat queries are requested absurd story of a practice attributed in legend to a

to head the second communication "Duplicate." Celtic saint whom we do not recognize as St. " Cowie," F. W. D. (“ Bibliography"):-Like most last-century though we are familiar with the district

said to have books relating to America, the Poems' of Freneau in the been under his patronage. Prof. Kovalevsky gives some original is scarce. It was reprinted by John Russell very interesting details both of Russian village com. Smith in a form similar to that of “The Library of Old munities and of the survival which he believes he has Authors," now published by Reeves & Turner. traced of Iranian culture among the peoples of the Caucasus. Some of the facts collected by the professor 6th S. vii. 309, and elicited a conjecture from MR. JULIAN

A. T. (“Black Maria ”).-Your question was asked and by official friends of his in the Caucasus are cer. tainly very striking, as evidences of an apparent survival MARSHALL (6th 8. vii. 355), but no definite information, of Zoroastrian practices and beliefs among nominally

LAKE LOTHING.-("Jettison Justice.") Do you not Christian races. A somewhat analogous case of the sur. refer to Jedwood justice, to bang a person first and try vival of their original Christian practices and beliefs him afterwards ? See Scott, Fair Maid of Perth among a nominally Mohammedan people might have cap. xxxii.-("Curse of St. Ernulphus.") Some conbeen cited from Bosnia, where the Begs accepted Islam tributor may be able to state what this signifies, only to save their lands and their position. Mr. J. G. G. S. P. (“Photographs").- We are unable to supply Frazer's paper on 'The Language of Animals' is full of the information you seek. interesting folk-tales, and opens a wide field for research.

J. E. P.(" Bristol Church owned by the Corporation "). The various index lists in course of publication will form

-An inquiry after other churches so owned, 7th 8. iii. a useful addition to the archæologist's library. The

148, remains unangwered. Revier, as a whole, seems likely to supply a want in our periodical literature, and its second volume promises to

F. B. (" Dancing as a Christian Ceremony ").-See 7th be quite as full of interest as the first.

8. iii. 166, 435; iv. 254, where all the information you

seek is given. We have received The Railway Diary and Official

X. Y. Z. (" Diet").-Such inquiries are outside our Directory for 1889, and two volumes of the “Novocastrian Series " from Mr. Walter Scott, Newcastle-on

sphere. Tyne.

Editorial Communications should be addressed to "The MR. W. RAE MACDONALD, F.F.A., has published a Editor of 'Notes and Queries'"-Advertisements and volume of great interest to mathematicians, in which he Business Letters to "The Publisher"-at the Office, 22, gives a translation of Napier's original description of the Took's Court, Cursitor Street, Chancery Lane, E.C. invention and construction of logarithms, which have We beg leave to state that we decline to return com80 greatly abridged the labour of calculations of many munications which, for any reason, we do not print; and kinds, but especially those required in astronomy, in to this rule we can make no exception,

NOTICE.

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