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LONDON, SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 1889. probable that the chronicler would take precedence

of the king, or that his name would be allowed a CONTENTS.-N° 159.

place in the rich foliation when those of kings, NOTES:-" Tanias el Rey,” 21 – Dictionary of National heroes, and architects were not so highly honoured. Biography,'

22-Christendom of Clothes, 23.--Sir John Haw. A man who bad deserved such esteem of his king kins - Shoemaker's Announcement-Whistling-Kittering, 24-Trowses - Bent-" The one " and the other"-Veins would most probably still exist in the memory of in the Nose--Bezonian - Anonymous Aid-Charles II., 25., present generations. His name and his chronicles Boulevards for London -Snob-Story concerning Cromwell -Relics of Charles I.-Chalet, 26.

could not have so completely disappeared from the

pages of contemporary writers had be, in that grand QUERIES :- The Court Secret'—' Tales of the Spanish Main' -Seringapatam – Frances Cromwell - Antique Screens

era of heroic navigators, outshone all by his writPerries–Dyer, of Sharpham-Sir Robt. Norter-Classifica- ings. tion of Clergy- The Flower Garden,' 27-Edw. Bristow

Tanias is a myth. Is it likely that the names of Court Rolls - Triple Cord - Tours Cathedral - Neuwied Ethnographicals — " Dolce far niente" - Arms Wanted - Vasco da Gama and Nuno Cabral, who had opened -Sandal Gates --Curious Work-"To leave the world better the eastern and western gates of the New World to than you found it"-Twizzel, 28-Mother Ludlam's Cauldron -Dr. Thompson-Coaching Prints-Josiah Burchill, 29.

commerce, should have been relegated to comREPLIES :-Tooth-brushes, 29-Big Books Big Bores - Names parative obscurity, and that this Tanias, of whom we in De Banco

Roll, 30 – Pounds - "Lord Bateman '-- Hampton know absolutely nothing, should have been imPoyle, 31 - Radical Reform-Defender of the Faith --Pro- mortalized by having his name inscribed amid the -Crombie - Yorkshire Expressions – Belgian Beer --Con- elaborate foliation springing from the sides of a fessor of the Household, 33-Historiated-Walpole Collec- sacred edifice, the last resting-place of some kings tion-Waterloo Ball- Monkey Island - Once a Week: 34- of glorious memory? Graham of Gartmore-Saloop-Harper-Marginalia of Coleridge-Parkin, 35-Flint Flakes - Dictionary Desiderata, 36 Many of the other derivations are equally absurd, - Harvest Horn – Liquid Gas - Thursk-Champflower and that given by John Latouche (Oswald Craw. Tweenie-" Grâce me guide"-Musical Taste in Birds, 37– Initials after Names - Printer's Chapel-Authors Wanted, 38. furd) in his Travels in Portugal' is not worthy of

much consideration. But Mr. Crawfurd is so NOTES ON BOOKS:-Bullen's · Campion'-'Dictionary of

National Biography, Vol XVII.- The Library - Dod's happy in most of his other suggestions that I may • Peerage.'

be allowed to repeat what he says on this subject : Notices to Correspondents, &c.

Tanias el Rey is, I have no doubt, only an anagram of Arte e Linyas. The puzzle is a good one, though not

quite fair, for the El rey is very misleading, and the use Potes.

of the Latinized Portuguese of the period has clearly

thrown the antiquaries off the scent." “TANIAS EL REY."

How the author of "Travels in Portugal' arrived So many descriptions of the monastery of Batalha at such a conclusion is as great a puzzle to me as have been published at various times that it would the inscription is to him. Under the roof of the be impossible to add to our knowledge of this monastery of Batalha were buried, as I have already wonderful pile, which has found so many admirers said, many of the kings, queens, princes, and among the savants of all countries. Of all the grandees of Portugal, and the building itself was descriptions, however, the most beautiful is that of erected to commemorate the great victory won at Fr. Luiz de Souza in his ‘Historia de S. Domingos,' Aljubarrota, which secured the independence of and the most correct that published in the Ecclesió- Portugal. The original church was finished before logist for August, 1854. That the Portuguese place 1416, but the Capella Imperfeita was commenced too great a value on the building, from an archi- at the close of the fifteenth century, shortly after tectural point of view, it is needless to say. No the accession of King D. Manoel the Fortunate, fewer than five architects seem to have been en- just when the discoveries of Vasco da Gama and gaged on this sacred edifice, composed of “spires, Nuno Cabral were astonishing the world and pinnacles, pierced battlements, and flying but filling the coffers of the Portuguese monarch. tresses ”; but to the last, Matheus Fernandez, who D. Mandel, it is well known, expended large died in 1515, belongs the glory of having built the sums in the erection of splendid edifices, and it can "Capella Imperfeita," or Unfinished Chapel, whose easily be conceived that a monarch whose ruling western arch surpasses in richness everything else passion was to raise majestic piles should have in the building On the western side of this arch built a chapel like the Capella Imperfeita, in which are repeated with great frequency the words “Tanias eventually he might be placed to rest. This would el Rey,” among knots, flowers, and foliage, and the only be following out what other kings and many meaning of these words has given rise to great dis- private persons had done before and have done putation at various times. By the majority of the since. That he was not buried there, but at Belem, Portuguese the words are supposed to commemorate means nothing more than that it was decided to the name of King D. Manoel's chronicler, but a bury him at Belem in the magnificent monastery careful search into contemporary history reveals no which he had caused to be erected. Having acsuch name as Tanias. Then, again, it is very im. cepted this theory, which to me seems reasonable,

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LONDON, SATURDAY, JANUARY 12, 1889.

probable that the chronicler would take precedence

of the king, or that his name would be allowed a CONTENTS.-N° 159.

place in the rich foliation when those of kings, NOTES :-" Tanias el Rey," 21 - Dictionary of National heroes, and architects were not so highly honoured.

Biography,' 22-Christendom of Clothes, 23.- Sir John Haw. A man who had deserved sucb esteem of his king kins - Shoemaker's Announcement-Whistling-Kittering, 24-Trowses - Bent-"The one and the other"– Veins would most probably still exist in the memory of in the Nose--Bezonian - Anonymous Aid-Charles II., 25., present generations. His name and his chronicles Boulevards for London --Snob story concerning Cromwell could not have so completely disappeared from the -Relics of Charles I.--Chalet, 26. QUERIES :- The Court Secret'—- Tales of the Spanish Main pages of contemporary writers had be, in that grand -Seringapatam - Frances Cromwell — Antique Screens

era of heroic navigators, outshone all by his writHerries --Dyer, of Sharpham-Sir Robt. Norter-Classifica- ings. tion of Clergy- The Flower Garden,' 27-Edw. Bristow

Tanias is a myth. Is it likely that the names of Court Rolls - Triple Cord - Tours Cathedral - Neuwied Ethnographicals Dolce far niente" - Arms Wanted - Vasco da Gama and Nuno Cabral, who had opened ---Sandal Gates - Curious Work-" To leave the world better the eastern and western gates of the New World to than you found it"-Twizzel, 28-Mother Ludlam's Cauldron - Dr. Thompson-Coaching Prints—Josiah Burchill, 29.

commerce, should have been relegated to com. REPLIES :- Tooth-brushes, 29– Big Books Big Bores - Names parative obscurity, and that this Tanias, of whom we in De Banco Roll, 30 – Pounds — "Lord Bateman "Hampton know absolutely nothing, should have been im. Poyle, 31-- Radical Reform-- Defender of the Faith --Pro- mortalized by having his name inscribed amid the gramme, 32 - Birmingham Magazine-Waik: Wene: Maik elaborate foliation springing from the sides of a fessor of the Household, 33—Historiated—Walpole Collec- sacred edifice, the last resting place of some kings tion-Waterloo Ball- Monkey Island - Once a Week' 34- of glorious memory ? Graham of Gartmore-Saloop-Harper-Marginalia of Coleridge-Parkin, 35-Flint Flakes-Dictionary Desiderata, 36

Many of the other

derivations are equally absurd, Harvest Horn – Liquid Gas — Thursk-Champflower and that given by John Latouche (Oswald CrawTweenie-" Grâce me guide"-Musical Taste in Birds, 37– Initials after Names – Printer's Chapel-Authors Wanted, 38. furd) in his Travels in Portugal' is not worthy of

much consideration. But Mr. Crawfurd is so NOTES ON BOOKS :-Bullen's Campion'- Dictionary of

National Biography, Vol xvII.- The Library -Dod's happy in most of his other suggestions that I may • Peerage.'

be allowed to repeat what he says on this subject : Notices to Correspondents, &c.

Tanias el Rey is, I have no doubt, only an anagram of Arte e Linyas. The puzzle is a good one, though not

quite fair, for the El rey is very misleading, and the use Potes.

of the Latinized Portuguese of the period has clearly

thrown the antiquaries off the scent." “TANIAS EL REY.”

How the author of Travels in Portugal' arrived So many descriptions of the monastery of Batalha at such a conclusion is as great a puzzle to me as have been published at various times that it would the inscription is to him. Under the roof of the be impossible to add to our knowledge of this monastery of Batalha were buried, as I have already wonderful pile, which has found so many admirers said, many of the kings, queens, princes, and among the savants of all countries. Of all the grandees of Portugal, and the building itself was descriptions, however, the most beautiful is that of erected to commemorate the great victory won at Fr. Luiz de Souza in his ‘Historia de S. Domingos,' Aljabarrota, which secured the independence of and the most correct that published in the Ecclesió- Portugal. The original church was finished before logist for August, 1854. That the Portuguese place 1416, but the Capella Imperfeita was commenced too great a value on the building, from an archi- at the close of the fifteenth century, shortly after tectural point of view, it is needless to say. No the accession of King D. Manoel the Fortunate, fewer than five architects seem to have been en- just when the discoveries of Vasco da Gama and gaged on this sacred edifice, composed of “spires, Nuno Cabral were astonishing the world and pinnacles, pierced battlements, and flying but filling the coffers of the Portuguese monarch. tresses"; but to the last, Matheus Fernandez, who D. Manoel, it is well known, expended large died in 1515, belongs the glory of having built the sums in the erection of splendid édifices, and it can “Capella Imperfeita," or Unfinished Chapel

, whose easily be conceived that a monarch whose ruling western arch surpasses in richness everything else passion was to raise majestic piles should have in the building. On the western side of this arch built a chapel like the Capella Imperfeita, in which are repeated with great frequency the words “Tanias eventually he might be placed to rest. This would el Rey,” among knots, flowers, and foliage, and the only be following out what other kings and many meaning of these words has given rise to great dis- private persons had done before and have done putation at various times. By the majority of the since. That he was not buried there, but at Belem, Portuguese the words are supposed to commemorate means nothing more than that it was decided to the name of King D. Manoel's chronicler, but a bury him at Belem in the magnificent monastery careful search into contemporary history reveals no which he had caused to be erected. Having acsuch name as Tanias. Then, again, it is very im- cepted this theory, which to me seems reasonable,

Pp. 145-6.

I understand the words “Tanias el Rey” to signify notice the sympatheticcure. He was answered by W. “Stop! be still! here lies the king," and I arrive at Foster, parson of Hedgley, Bucks., in 'Hoplocrismathis conclusion by the following simple reading : spongus, or a Sponge to wipe away the Weapon Ta is an interjection signifying in Portuguese hold, Salve, 4to., 1631, whereupon came forth 'Dr. forbear, stop, be still, keep off your hands. N is Fludd's Answer unto M. Foster, or The Squeesing employed as denoting the place, and as the abbre- of Parson Foster's Sponge, London, 4to., pp. 220, viation of “in the. It is used for “here," and 1631. Dr. John Hales, of Eton, also wrote against gives a finish to the anagram. Tas is simply jas Dr. Fludd in a letter to Sir K. Digby, printed with (lies), which is used in Portugal to this day on all his 'Golden Remains.' Others are : - Nicolai tombstones, and is a corruption of jacet. Sculptors Papinii de Pulvere Sympathetico Dissertatio,' Paris, invariably render the j ani, as the u is rendered v. 1650 and 1681 ; 'La Poudre de Sympathie deEl Rey, the king—"Silence ! here lies the king.” fendue contre les Objections de M. Cattier,' par What more appropriate words could we imagine N. Papin, Paris, 1651, both 8vo.; ‘History of for such a place ?

C. SELLERS. Generation, examining the opinion of Sir K.

Digby, with a Discourse on the Cure of Wounds

by Sympathy,' by N. Highmore, M.D., 16mo., DICTIONARY OF NATIONAL BIOGRAPHY': 1651 ; 'Medicina Magnetica : or, the Rare and NOTES AND CORRECTIONS.

Wonderful Art of Curing by Sympatby,' by C. (See 6th S. xi. 105, 443; xii. 321 ; 7th $. 1, 25, 82, 342, Irvine (?), 12mo., 1656 ; Aditus Novus ad 376; ii. 102, 324, 355; iii. 101, 382; iv. 123, 325, 422; | Occultas Sympathiæ et Antipathiæ Causas inv. 3, 43, 130, 362, 463, 506.)

veniendas,' by Sylvester Rattray, M.D., Glasgow, Vol. XV.

18mo., Tubingæ, 1660 ; Theatrum SympathetiP. 2 a. Prior's reference to Dibben is in the folio cum, 12mo., Norimb., 1660, 1661, 1662, containedition of his 'Poems,' 1718.

ing Fludd, Digby, Rattray, Papin, Goclenius, P. 32 a. R. Ascham salutes a person named Strauss

, Helmont, and several others ; 'Lettre à Dickinson in one of his letters (1602, p. 214). M. B--, sur l'impossibilité des Opérations SymP. 35 a. For “Rutly” read Rutty.

pathetiques,' 12mo., 1697; 'The Art of Caring P. 36 b. For “Muskam” read Muskham. Sympathetically proved to be true,' by H. M. HerP. 53 a. Dive. 56 a. Dyve.

wig, 12m0., 1699. Digby’s ‘Sympathy' was quoted P. 62 a. Thomas Randolph also wrote 'An by Malebranche (' Search after Truth,' book ii. Elegio upon the Lady Venetia Digby,' 1668, p. 28. part i. chap. vii.) and by J. A. Blondel ( Power of He also dedicated his Jealous Lovers' 'to Sir Mother's Imag.,' 1729). The weapon-salve was Kenelm Digby in verse. Sir J. Denham mentions made known to modern readers by Sir W. Scott, a Latin Ms. by Mancini on the ‘Cardinal Virtues,' who gave a long account of it in the notes to the which had passed through the learned hands of Sir 'Lay of the Last Minstrel,' iii. xxiii. More in K. D. ('Poems,' 1684, p. 145). On Lady Venetia N. & Q.,' 2nd S., 3rd S.,

s.v. “Weapon-Salve." gee ‘N. & Q.,' 7th S. iii. 162, 209.

Pp. 65 b, 66 a. For “Higham” read Highmore. Pp. 64-5. Sir K. Digby's 'Observations on P. 65 b. For“Hartmann” read Hartman. Religio Medici,' 12mo. 1644. They were answered P. 70 b. Blundevile refers to Digges's ' Pantoby Alex. Ross, Medicus Medicatus,' 1645. He metria,' ' Exercises,' 1606, 314 b. also replied to Digby's work on 'Bodies and the P. 101. Prof. Disney was an examiner for the Soul' in the Philosophicall Touchstone,'sm. 4to., Craven scholarship, 1759 (Wrangham's 'Zouch, 1645 ;. 'Demonstratio Immortalitatis Animæ,' vol. i. p. xxxi). edited by Thomas White, translated into Latin by P. 123 a. Pope's praise of Sir W. Dixey (1710) J. L., Paris, folio, 1651, 1655; Francof., 80., in Curll's 'Miscellany,' 1727, i. 42. 1664 ; 'Peripateticall Institutions in the way of P. 127 b. For "Mapleton” read Mappleton. Sir K. D.,' by Thomas White, 12mo., 1656 ; P. 130 b. For “ Kennet” read Kennett. Digby's 'Powder of Sympathy,' 12mo., third edi P. 135. Much about Dobree in Prof. Pryme's tion, 1660, fourth, 1664; and in French, Paris, Reminiscences'; 'Life of Bishop Wordsworth.' 1658, 1681 ; also with the 'Treatise of Bodies," P. 140 a. There is a long account of William 1669. Of his ‘Receipts' there seem to be editions Dockwra, his scheme and his difficulties, in De1668, 1675, 1677; of the Closet Opened,' 1669, laune's 'Present State of London,' 1681, pp. 350 1671, 1677; of 'Chymical Secrets,' 1682. George sq. He was a merchant, native, and citizen of Hartman also issued The True Preserver and Re- London, formerly a sub-searcher in the Custom storer of Health,' 8vo., 1682, 1684, 1695 ; 'Family House there. He had eight young children. The Physitian,' small 4to., 1696. John Hartman pub-chief office of the penny post was at his house, lished 'Royal and Practical Chymistry,' fol. 1670. formerly that of Sir Robert Abdy, Kot. He beOp. Dis works see Birch, 'Hist. Roy. Soc,' ii. 82: gan the ponds post in April, 1680 (not 1683 as Watt, ‘Bibl. Brit. Dr. Robert Fludd seems to here). have been the first English author to bring into

Richard Baxter calls John Dod

"excellent,” and says that his book on the Com P. 402 a. Hugh Downman. See ‘N. & Q.,' 3rd mandments is “ of small price and great use (“Ref. S. ix. 107. For“ Cyrus” read Cyres. Past.,' 85, 153). His 'Sayings' and 'Sermon on Pp. 441-2. Sir F. Drake is mentioned in BlundeMalt' have been often reprinted as chap.books. vile's ' Exercises' and in Owen’s ‘Epigrams.' On the malt sermon see Penny Magazine, 1832, Pp. 446-7. James Drake. See 'N. & Q.,' 15 S. p. 6; E. H. Barker's 'Lit. Anec.,' i. 103; Athe- viii. 272, 346 ; 3rd S. iv. 435 ; 5th S. ii. 389. His næum, 1869 ; Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and 'Ancient and Modern Stages Surveyed, against Fable,' 545; 'New and Old,' 1876, iv. 16; Bicker-Collier, 1699; translated Leclerc's History of dyke's 'Curios. Ale and Beer,' 1887. See also Physic,'1699; edited 'Secret Memoirs of Dudley,' 'N. & Q.;'6th S. ii. 327; iii, 13.

1706. His ‘Anatomy,' 2 vols., 1750 ; 'AnthroP. 157 a. Much about William Dodd in ‘N. & pologia,' an appendix, 1728 ; 'Onania,' 1737. Q.' (see 5th S. i. 488). He published two sermons P. 448. Nathan Drake belonged to the same on fasting, preached at West Ham and St. Olave's, family as Dr. Samuel of Pontefract. He dedicated Hart Street (second edition, 1756).

his Winter Nights,' 1820, to his mother, living P. 158. A *Treatise of Estates,' ascribed to Sir in York, in her eighty-eighth year. No mention J. Doddridge, was printed with some of Sir Wm. is made of his two earliest works, 'The Speculator,' Noy's works, 1757, 1821.

1790 ; 'Poems,'1793. Notices of him in Monthly P. 160. On Doddridge's "gay temper” see Literary Recreations, No. 7, January, 1807 ; Roberts’s ‘Life of H. More,' ii. 453. His “Ex- 'Living Authors,' 1816; Annual Biog., xxi. 1837, positor' was recommended by Bishops Porteus of p. 448 ; Allibone ; Cleveland, 'Eng. Lit. NineLondon, Barrington of Durham, and Pretyman teenth Cent.'; portrait engraved by Tomkins and Tomline of Lincoln (Overton, 'True Churchmen,' | Thomson. 1802, p. 383; 'Life of W. Wilberforce'; Tyer P. 449 a. “Love's Name Lives, or a Publication man's Oxford Methodists').

of Divers Petitions presented by Mistris Love to P. 168 a. Thomas Warton sounds Dodington's the Parliament on behalf of her Husband ; also “ much lov'd name” in verse (“Poems,' 1748, p. several Letters sent to him by Dr. Drake, &c., 92).

1651." P. 178 a. When R. W. Sibthorpe seceded to the P. 449 b. Samuel Drake was a pupil of John Roman Church and published his “Reasons,'| Cleveland, whose works be edited with a memoir Dodsworth replied in a letter, "Why have you (D. N. B.,' xi. 50, 52). His two assize sermons at become a Romanist ?” 8vo., 16 leaves, three edi. York, Ocow Alákovos, 1669, and 'Totum Hominis,' tions, 1842.

March 15 (? year), were published by Wm. Miller, P. 185 a. An account of Doggett's rowing prize Gilded Acorn, St. Paul's Churchyard. His enin the Free-Thinker, August 1, 1718.

graved portrait, 4to., by Birrel and Wilkinson. P. 191 b. Sir G. Wbeler's congratulatory letter See much in Holmes's 'Pontefract, 1887. to Dolben on becoming Archbishop of York P. 450 a. 'Concio ad Clerum, 1719 (on St. (Wrangham's 'Zouch,' ii. 156; Patrick’s ‘Auto- Matthew xxvi. 29), is here attributed to both biography,' 35).

Samuel Drakes. There is a 'Concio' by Dr. S. P. 193 b. For "Bishopsthorpe" read Bishop- Drake (? which) on Acts xvii. 22, 23. Samuel thorpe.

Drake, jun., was born at Pontefract, 1688, eduP. 201 a. For “Spalatro" read Spalato. cated at Sedbergh, entered as a sizar at St. John's, P. 206 a. For “ Anderby” read Aind by. Cambridge, May 4, 1704 (Adm. Reg. St. John's,

P. 212 a, line 8 from foot. Insert inverted Cambridge'; Whitaker's 'Richmondshire,' 1823, comma after “untenable."

i. 328). P. 228 a. See De Quincey's account of Donne's

P. 450 b. William Drake. Annual Register, 'Biathanatos' in his essay 'On Suicide' ('Eng. 1801, p. 68. His portrait engraved by Bromley. Opium-Eater '). Archbishop Trench's character of

W. C. B. Donne ought not to be overlooked ('Household Book Eng. Poet.,' 403–4). Parnell versified some CARISTENDOM OF CLOTHES.-In Henry VIII.,' of Donne's satires. Coleridge's praise of his ser- I. iii., the Lord Chamberlain says of the Englishmons (* Table-Talk,' June 4, 1830) and defence of men lately returned from France :him against Pope and Warburton ('Lectures on Their clothes are after such a Pagan cut too, Shakspere,' 1883, pp. 358, 410, 427).

That sure th' have worn out Christendom, P. 238 b. Bishop Dopping married a sister of The phrase is puzzling, though, if it stood alone, William Molyneux, Locke's correspondent (Locke's it might be passed over with the explanation, that * Letters,' 1708, p. 211).

the clothes in their outlandish cut had lost, i.e., P. 249 b. For “Quainton” read Quinton (?) never possessed, a proper Christian look. But I (bis).

find a similar phrase in Lyly's 'Euphues' (p. 443, P. 338 a. On Bishop Douglas and his 'Criterion' Arber). He is counselling the ladies against see Mathias, 'Purs. of Lit.,' 300, 432.

pride of apparel, and he says, “ Bicause you are

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