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It is a great pleasure to read this type of book

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It is the nice book of indian writer

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The god of small things is not so worthy as to be kept closed Then think of the dis very of India Glimpses of world history LE miserble' and many of Tagore and so snd so...

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Rarely does one come across a book so beautiful that the picture it paints in your mind stays with you long after you have flipped the last page, with a heavy heart, if I may be allowed to add. A book worded so intricately and enchantingly that it makes you read on, even if the story does not progress the way you would have liked it to.
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Date: 09 Dec 2013
By: TRANSverse
Comment: 582
That something happened when personal turmoil dropped by at the wayside shrine of the vast, violent, circling, driving, ridiculous, insane, unfeasible
, public turmoil of a nation. That Big God howled like a hot wind, and demanded obeisance. Then Small God (cozy and contained, private, and limited) came away cauterized, laughing humbly at his own temerity.
-Arundhati Roy
When Arundhati Roy’s semi-autobiographical novel, The God of Small Things, was published in 1997, it received both praise and harsh criticism. While many critics and reviewers from around the world praised it for its technical virtuosity and thematic concerns, the voices and reactions heard from Roy’s native country, India, were disconcerting. In Kerala, a state in the south-west coast of India, where the story takes place, conservative Christians and hardline communists alike stood against the novel’s publication and distribution in India, despite the positive media attention Kerala would draw through this Booker prize winning novel. A Syrian Christian lawyer named Sabu Thomas even filed a petition against Roy to remove the final chapter from her novel for its sexually explicit content. What provoked him was the lovemaking scene of a higher-caste Christian woman and a lower-caste man. Similarly, communists attacked the novel for bourgeois aesthetics as well as anti-communist sentiments. EMS Namboodiripad, the communist leader whose name figures in the novel, concedes it as a truthful depiction of Ipe family members’ deviant sexuality, but condemned it for following decadent aspect of western literary imagery – “sexual anarchy,” [1] as well as caricaturing communist party members and defaming the communist code of conduct (“EMS Picks on Arundathi”). Along with EMS Namboodiripad, a prominent Indian Marxist critic, Aijaz Ahmed, acknowledges the realist turn of her novel only in depicting “the tale of private life in the form of what is basically a miniaturized family saga,” but not the communist movement in Kerala. For him “the limits of [Roy’s] private experience seem also to be the limits of her Realism” (112). The reactions of the members of the Church and the communist party, who have revolutionized the Kerala society from time to time, make one curious about the moral and ideological controversy of Roy’s narration. Was it really her use of sexual imagery and/or her critique of communism that angered the critics, or was it her careful unraveling of something unexpected and hideous in the political and religious establishments in Kerala?
The plot of the novel revolves around the Ipe family, a wealthy Syrian Christian family that includes grandmother Mammachi, her divorced son Chacko, her divorced daughter Ammu, Ammu’s twins Rahel and Estha, and an unmarried aunt Baby Kochamma. Another character is grandfather who, though already dead, exerts a strong influence in the narrative and often surfaces through the remembrance of living characters. Rahel’s return from America to her hometown Aymenam and her remembrance of the past serve as the focal narrative of the story. Though the narrative centers around two incidents from the past, the death of Sophie mol, Chacko’s British daughter, and the tragic love affair of Ammu and untouchable carpenter Velutha, the former one mainly functions as a catalyst to latter, the final tragedy.
Although The God of Small Things tells the story of the Ipe family and their adjustments to the postcolonial situation in Kerala, it highlights Velutha’s fight against the hierarchical structures in a caste-ridden society. Velutha’s story is tied to the official narrative in India, the caste narrative, where one is born into a particular caste and abides by its rules. However, Velutha’s heritage does not end there. Two generations ago, his entire family converted to Christianity to escape inequality and intolerance in caste system. And Velutha, in his effort to move to an ideal society, joins communist party. Though
 

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The novel takes place in Ayemenem, a village in the southwestern Indian state of Kerala, in 1969 and 1993. The narrative shifts back and forth in time in a series of flashbacks, memories, and foreshadowing of what's ahead. The plot centers on Estha and Rahel, fraternal boy and girl twins living with their divorced mother, Ammu, and her family. The book gives us many different stories about a number of the characters involved, showing how each person's story got us to the place where we end up. It forces us to think about whether things happen randomly or if they're meant to be. Good job by Roy. 

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ye book padhne ke baad mujhe nasha aaya tha, aur nashe ke baad maine ye book padhi thi..

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it was lame

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