Parliamentary Papers, House of Commons and Command, Volume 45

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Page 5 - I went, to come away so favourably disposed as to advise a friend to send a subscription to your charitable fund, and I need not tell you that I have taken, some pains to make myself acquainted with the rise, progress, and medical treatment of cholera, and that I claim for myself some...
Page 5 - You are aware that I went to your hospital prepossessed against the homoeopathic system ; that you had in me, in your camp, an enemy rather than a friend, and that I must therefore have seen some cogent reason there, the first day I went, to come away so favourably disposed as to advise a friend to send a subscription to your charitable fund, and I need not tell you...
Page 5 - That there may therefore be no misapprehension about the cases I saw in your hospital, I will add, that all I saw were true cases of cholera, in the various stages of the disease ; and that I saw several cases which did well under your treatment, which I have no hesitation in saying would have sunk under any other.
Page 38 - Board, and their immediate officials ; on the contrary, they have labored with earnest and conscientious zeal in the discharge of the duties imposed upon them, and the errors to be pointed out reside entirely in the system itself. (A.) It is manifest, in the first place, that the vaccination of the people, which is a measure undertaken by the State for the security of the public, has nothing in it of the character of alms, and does not fall properly under a department of government whose sole function...
Page 39 - ... the progress of the vaccine disease which are imperatively necessary, a point to which further allusion will be made hereafter. (D.) But no compulsory enactment, however comprehensive and stringent ; no alteration in the mode of appointing public vaccinators. however desirable ; no additional remuneration and encouragement to them, however necessary, will be sufficient to secure the grand object to be had in view, the universal diffusion of vaccination and the extinction of small -pox, unless...
Page 5 - I saw several cases which did well under your treatment, which I have no hesitation in saying would have sunk under any other. " In conclusion, I must repeat to you what I have already told you, and what I have told every one with whom I have conversed, that although an Allopath by...
Page 38 - ... Vaccination, like many other great and beneficial discoveries, has had, and still has, prejudices to encounter, and it is of the last importance that it should be presented for public acceptance in the manner most calculated to soften and subdue these prejudices. But to stamp it with pauperism, or give it even the semblance of an act of Poor-law relief, is not to soften and subdue, but to aggravate and add to prejudice ; and this has unquestionably been the result (as has been repeatedly noticed...
Page 3 - I claim for myself some right to be able to recognize the disease, and to know something of what the medical treatment ought to be ; and, that there may be no misapprehension about the cases I saw in your hospital, I will add that all I saw were true cases of cholera, in various stages of disease ; and that I saw several cases which did well under your treatment, which, I have no hesitation in saying, would have sunk under any other.
Page 38 - ... able to select the practitioner by whom they would desire it to be performed. (C.) The present system has been faulty in this respect, that the provisions for the remuneration of public vaccinators have not been such as to secure their hearty and zealous co-operation. The most injurious consequences have undoubtedly resulted from this, both in limiting the numbers vaccinated and in discouraging the vaccinators from giving that pains and attention to watch the progress of the vaccine disease which...
Page 38 - ... a department of government whose sole function is the distribution of alms, while it is equally obvious that it does fall naturally under a department charged with the maintenance of the public health. Had there been such a department in existence when vaccination was first made a matter of public concern, there can be no doubt that the duty would have been placed in their hands, and it is not only proper, but highly politic, that it should now be transferred to them. Vaccination, like many other...

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