Malebranche's Theory of the Soul: A Cartesian Interpretation

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Oxford University Press, Sep 5, 1996 - Philosophy - 320 pages
This book offers a provocative interpretation of the theory of the soul in the writings of the French Cartesian, Nicolas Malebranche (1638-1715). Though recent work on Malebranche's philosophy of mind has tended to emphasize his account of ideas, Schmaltz focuses rather on his rejection of Descartes' doctrine that the mind is better known than the body. In particular, he considers and defends Malebranche's argument that this rejection has a Cartesian basis. Schmaltz reveals that this argument not only provides a fresh perspective on Cartesianism but also is relevant to current debates in the philosophy of mind.
 

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Contents

412 Malebranches Cartesian Argument
136
42 The Cartesians and Malebranches Argument
142
422 Cartesian Sources for Malebranches Argument
146
43 Descartes and the Real Distinction Argument
149
432 The Idea of Body and the Unextended Mind
156
IMMORTALITY
163
51 Descartes Proof of Immortality
164
512 The Proof in the Synopsis
165

133 Consciousness and the Subjective View
40
SENSATION
44
21 Sensations and Body
45
212 Sensations Occasionalism and Bodily Qualities
49
213 Sensation and the Teachings of Nature
59
22 Two Kinds of Knowledge
63
222 Knowledge of Soul through Inner Sentiment
69
23 Two Cartesian Arguments
78
232 Knowledge of Sensation through Experience
84
PURE PERCEPTION
93
31 Pure Understanding and Sentiment
94
312 Sentiment and Sensation
101
32 Idea Sensation and Pure Perception
109
322 Sensation and Pure Perception
114
Clear Demonstrations of Properties
125
SPIRITUALITY
127
41 Malebranche on Spirituality
129
52 Malebranches Proof of Immortality
170
521 Animal Souls and Immortality
171
522 The Proof in the Recherche
173
523 The Proof in the Entretiens sur la mort
180
53 Desgabets on the Indefectibility of Substance
184
532 Eternal Truths Substance and the Divine Will
187
FREEDOM
192
61 The Nature of the Will
193
612 Spiritual Habits Moral Worth and the Will
197
62 The Nature of Freedom
204
622 Descartes on Freedom Indifference and Divine Power
207
623 The Cartesians on Mental Causation and Motion
213
624 Malebranche on Freedom and the Motion of the Will
217
Notes
235
Bibliography
289
Index
302
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Page 27 - And as I observed that in the words I think, hence I am, there is nothing at all which gives me assurance of their truth beyond this, that I see very clearly that in order to think it is necessary to exist...
Page 2 - La vie de Caesar n'a poinct plus d'exemple que la nostre pour nous : et emperiere, et populaire, c'est tousjours une vie que tous accidents humains regardent.
Page 27 - For it is a contradiction to suppose that what thinks does not, at the very time when it is thinking, exist. Accordingly, this piece of knowledge, / am thinking, therefore I exist, is the first and most certain of all to occur to anyone who philosophizes in an orderly way.

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