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ration. My mind underwent a strange revolution. · I no longer distinct: ly knew where I was, or could diftinguish fiction from reality. I look ed wildly and with glaffy eyes all round the room ; I gazed at the fsgure of Mary ; I thought it was, and it was not, Mary. With mad and idle action I put fome provisions on her plate; I bowed to her in mockery, and invited her to eat. Then again I grew serious and vehement; I addressed her with inward and convulsive accents in the language of reproach ; I declaimed with uncommon flow of words upon bandoned and infernal deceit; all the tropes that imagination ever supplied to the tongue of man seemed to be at my command. I know not whether this speech was to be considered as earnelt, or as the Sardonic and bitter jest of a maniac. But, while I was still speaking, I law her move-if I live, I saw it. She turned her

eyes
this
way

and that ; she grinned and chattered at me. I looked from her to the other figure ; that grinned and chattered too. Instantly a full and proper madness seized me; I grinned and chattered in turn to the figures ben fore me. It was not words that. I heard or utrered ; it was murmurs and hisings, and lowings and howls. I became furious. I dashed the organ into a thousand fragments. I rent the child-bed linen, and tore it with my teeth. I dragged the clothes which Mary had worn, from off the figure that represented her, and rent them into long strips and Ihreds. I truck the figures vehemently with the chairs and other furniture of the room, till they were broken to pieces. I threw at them, in despite, the plates and other brittle implements of the supper-table. I raved and roared with all the power of my voice. I must have made a noise like hell broke loose ; but I had given my valet a charge that I should not be intruded upon ; and he, who was one of the tallest and Itrongest of men, and who ever executed his orders literally, obstinately defended the door of my chamber againit all inquisitiveness. At the time, this behaviour of his I regarded as fidelity ; it will be accounted for hereafter. He was the tool of Gifford; he had orders that I should not be disturbed; it was hoped that this scene would be the conclusion of my existence. I am firmly persuaded that, in the last hour or two, I suffered tortures not inferior to those which the North American savages inflict on their victims; and, like thole victims, when the apparatus of torture was suspended, I funk into immediate insensibility. In this state I was found, with all the lights of the apartment extiriguished, when, at last, the seemingly ftupid exactuels of my valet gave way to the impatience of others, and they broke open the door.' Vol. III. p. 248-253.

The reit of the story may be comprised in a few words. Gif. ford, whom Fleetwood had constituted his heir, becomes impatient to enter upon poffesfion; and, finding his patron’s constitution proof against mental distress, he attempts, with the assistance of two ruffians, to murder him in the forest of Fontainbleau. As all Fleetwood's servants were in Gifford's pay, they faw this transaction take place without interference-a circumstance which Art. XVI. Ancient and Modern Malta: containing a Deferiptur

of the Ports and Cities of the Islands of Malta and Goza ; the History of the Knights of St John of Jerusalem; and a particular Account of the Events which preceded and attended its Capture by the French, and its Conqueft by the English. By Louis de Boilgelin, Knight of Malta.

3 vols. 4to. G. & J. Robinson, London. 1804 In order to form a proper estimate of the importance of the iland of Malta in the prefent crifis of European affairs, it is neceffary to consider the wide field of action which the Mediterranean prefents to the ambition of the present Ruler of France. Had bis darling fyftem of aggrandisement been somewhat more equivocal, had he even availed himself of common diplomatic address in masking the defigns he had in view, the « miserable rock,' which he has himself taught us to appretiate, might now have been infrsmental in forwarding those plans which, we trust, it will long enable us to baffle. Bat feareely was the ratification of the treaty of Amiens exchanged, before the whole of his alarming system became visible. The unwarrantable acquisition of territory on the continent, the insulting report of 'Sebaftiani's mislion, and his own barefaced avowal to the British Ambafador, clearly evinced, tha: his extreme anxiety to dispoffets us of this post, previous even 19 the fulfilment of certain preliminary ftipulations, arose from 21other motive than the mere desire of executing the tenth article of the treaty.

With respect to the Atipulation which provided for the re-eitablishment of the ancient government, it was evident, that under the existing circumstances it could not possibly take effect; for the Tesources of the Order, almost annihilated by the alienation of its continental estates, were totally inadequate to the support of such an establishment: the Knights had loft (if, indeed, they ever poffeffed) the confidence of the Maltese, and even if thefe formidable objections had been obviated, an insurmountable bar ftill remained, in a want of fecurity for the future independence of the island. Whilft his Consular Majesty was imperiously demanding the execution of the treaty of Amiens, the whole treaty of Amiens, and nothing but the treaty of Amiens,' he forgos, or at least did not chuse to remember, that he required what it was not possible for Britain to grant; for there were certain powers called upon, in terms of the treaty, to guarantee the 10th article. Of these, some, it is true, nominally acceded to the measure ; but they did so at the very moment when they were appropriating those estates without which the Order of St John could not pof

fibly fublift; and Russia, the greatest of them all, positively refused to accede to the proposal, except upon conditions totally inconfiftent with the letter and the spirit of the article. Under these circumstances, had Great Britain consented to evacuate the island, what would have been the probable consequences ? Excluded for ever from the Mediterranean, we should soon have heard, with unavailing regret, of our faithful ally the King of Naples being superseded in the throne of the Two Sicilies by some member of the new royal family of France. Deprived of the means of exercising any effectual interference, Britain must have remained a quiet spectator of the dismemberment and partition of the Turkish empire, the colonization of Egypt, and the subjugation of Barbary. Amidit the ardour of conqueft, France would not have overlooked the opportunity afforded her of acquiring consequence as a maritime power. Her monopoly of the Levant trade would have afforded a constant supply of feamen; and the Toulon feet, no longer overawed by the detested presence of a Nelson, might have cruized unmolefted from the Straits of Gibraltar to the banks of the Black sea. It may be said indeed, that the jealousy of Russia would not have permitted her to remain a quiet spectator of all those usurpations; and the observation is probably just; the mutual interest of the two powers might have diđated an arrangement by no means favourable to the general interests of Europe. Without speculating on the probable consequences of an attack upon our East-India poffeffions from the fide of Egypt, we conceive that our mercantile and colonial interests would have had sufficient ground of alarm, in witnessing either or both of the above enterprising powers exclusively poffefled of the fertile shores of Egypt, Barbary, and the Morea.

In whatever light we view Malta, its value to this country cannot be too highly appreciated. As a military post, affording us the probable means of watching and defeating the dehgns of France, it is, at this period, inestimable ; and as a commercial ftation, calculated to facilitate our intercourse with the Levant nd Black sea, it pofTeffes every advantage; for where can a more desirable fituation be imagined for a depot, than an island placed in the centre of the Mediterranean, containing safe and capacious harbours, and potselling the most complete lazaretto in Europe ?

Monf. de Boisgelin indeed regards this island in a very different light. In his estimation, it is no otherwise important than as it is connected with the Order to which he belongs. Like a true Knight of Malta, he labours to prove, that the age of chivalry is not gone; or, to use his own words, That the Order of Malta has for years past distinguished itself for piety and military exploits in as illustrious a manner as during the most renowned N 2

ages

ART. XVI. Ancient and Modern Malta : containing a Defeription

of the Ports and Cities of the Islands of Malta and Goza ; the History of the Knights of St John of Jerusalem ; and a particular Account of the Events which preceded and attended its Capture by the French, and its Conquest by the English. By Louis de Boilgelin, Knight of Malta. 3 vols. 4to. G. & J. Robinson,

London. 1804. In order to form a proper estimate of the importance of the island of Malta in the present crifis of European affairs, it is neceffary to consider the wide field of action which the Mediterranean prefents to the ambition of the present Ruler of France. Had his darling fyftem of aggrandisement beer fomewhat more equivocal, had he even availed himself of common diplomatic address in masking the defigns he had in view, the miserable rock,' which he has himself taught us to appretiate, might now have been inftrumental in forwarding those plans which, we trust, it will long enable us to baflte. But searcely was the ratification of the treaty of Amiens exchanged, before the whole of his alarming fyftem became visible. The unwarrantable acquisition of territory on the continent, the insulting report of Sebaftiani's mission, and his own barefaced avowal to the British Ambaffador, clearly evinced, that his extreme anxiety to difpoffefs us of this post, previous even to the fulfilment of certain preliminary ftipulations, arose from another motive than the mere desire of executing the tenth article of

the treaty.

With respect to the stipulation which provided for the re-establishment of the ancient government, it was evident, that under the existing circumftances it could not possibly take effect; for the Tesources of the Order, almost annihilated by the alienation of its continental eftates, were totally inadequate to the support of fuch an establishment: the Knights had loft (if, indeed, they ever poffeffed) the confidence of the Maltese ; and even if these formidable objections had been obviated, an infurmountable bar still Temained, in a want of security for the future independence of the island. While his Consular Majesty was imperiously demanding the execution of the treaty of Amiens, the whole treaty of Amiens, and nothing but the creaty of Amiens,' he forgot, or at least did not chuse to remember, that he required what it was not possible for Britain to grant; for there were certain powers called upon, in terms of the treaty, to guarantee the 10th article. Of these, some, it is true, nominally acceded to the measure ; but they did so at the very moment when they were appropriating chole estates without which the Order of St John could not por

fibly fublift; and Russia, the greatest of them all, positively refused to accede to the proposal, except upon conditions totally inconsistent with the letter and the spirit of the article. Under these circumstances, had Great Britain confented to evacuate the island, what would have been the probable consequences ? Excluded for ever from the Mediterranean, we should loon have heard, with unavailing regret, of our faithful ally the King of Naples being superseded in the throne of the Two Sicilies by some member of the new royal family of France. Deprived of the means of exercising any etrectual interference, Britain must have remained a quiet spectator of the dismemberment and partition of the Turkish empire, the colonization of Egypt, and the fubjugation of Barbary. Amidst the ardour of conquest, France would not have overlooked the opportunity afforded her of acquiring consequence as a maritime power. Her monopoly of the Levant trade would have afforded a constant supply of feamen ; and the Toulon fleet, no longer overawed by the detefted presence of a Nelson, might have cruized unmolefted from the Straits of Gibraltar to the banks of the Black fea. It may be said indeed, that the jealousy of Russia would not have permitted her to remain a quiet spectator of all those usurpations; and the observation is probably just; but the mutual interest of the two powers might have dictated an arrangement by no means favourable to the general interests of Europe. Without fpeculating on the probable consequences of an attack upon our East-India poffeffions from the fide of Egypt, we conceive that our mercantile and colonial interests would have had sufficient ground of alarm, in witnessing either or both of the above enterpriling powers exclusively possefled of the fertile shores of Egypt, Barbary, and the Morea.

In whatever light we view Malta, its value to this country cannot be too highly appretiated. As a military post, affording us the probable means of watching and defeating the designs of France, it is, at this period, inestimable ; and as a commercial Itation, calculated to facilitate our intercourse with the Levant and Black fea; it poflefles every advantage; for where can a more desirable situation be imagined for a depot, than an island placed in the centre of the Mediterranean, containing safe and capacious harbours, and poffeffing the most complete lazaretto in Europe ?

Monf. de Boisgelin indeed regards this,illand in a very different light. In his estimation, it is no otherwise important than as it is connected with the Order to which he belongs. Like a true Knight of Malta, he labours to prove, that the age of chivalry is not gone; or, to use his own words, "That the Order of Malta has for years past distinguished itself for piety and military exploits in as illustrious a manner as during the most renowned N 2

ages

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