The works of Samuel Johnson [ed. by F.P. Walesby].

Front Cover
Talboys and Wheeler ; and W. Pickering, 1825
 

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Contents

On the trades of London
41
Idlehope
46
Apology for neglecting officious advice
52
Incitement to enterprise and emulation Some account of the admirable Crichton
57
Folly of false pretences to importance A journey in a stagecoach
62
Study composition and converse equally necessary to intellectual accomplishment
68
Criticism on the Pastorals of Virgil
73
Apology for apparent plagiarism Sources of literary variety
79
Projectors injudiciously censured and applauded
84
Infelicities of retirement to men of business
89
Different opinions equally plausible
94
On the uncertainty of human things
100
The pleasures and advantages of industry
104
he itch of writing universal
109
The folly of creating artificial wants
114
The miseries of life
119
Solitude not eligible
123
Men differently employed unjustly censured by each other
128
Singularities censured
133
Writers not a useless generation
139
Their happiness and infelicity
144
THE IDLER
149
NlJID ViCf 1 The Idleus character
151
Invitation to correspondents
154
Idlers reason for writing
157
Charities and hospitals
160
Scheme for newswriters l ri9 II I I in of military discipline
172
Progress of idleness
177
Political credulity
179
Discourses on the weather
183
Marriages why advertised
184
The imaginary housewife
187
Robbery of time
192
Treacles complaint of his wife
193
Druggets retirement
196
Expedients of idlers
198
Drugget vindicated
201
Whirlerscharacter
203
Capture of Louisbourg
207
Lingers history of Hstlessness
210
Imprisonment of debtors
213
Uncertainty of friendship
216
Man does not always think
219
New actors on the stage
221
Betty Brooms history
224
Power of habits
230
Betty Brooms history continued
233
Corruption of newswriters
236
Disguises of idleness Sobers character
239
On Sleep
242
Journal of a fellow of a college
245
Punch and conversation compared
249
Nums Pace 36 Auclionhunter described and ridiculed
252
The terrific diction ridiculed
253
Deborah Gingers account of citywits
288
The bustle of idleness described and ridiculed
291
Marvels journey narrated
294
Marvels journey paralleled
297
Domestick greatness unattainable
299
Selfdenial necessary
302
Mischiefs of good company
305
Mrs Savechargcs complaint
308
Authors mortifications
312
Virtuosos whimsical
315
Character of Sophron
318
Expectations of pleasure frustrated
322
Books fall into neglect
323
Minim the critic
325
Minim the critic
329
Rangers account of the vanity of riches
332
Progress of arts and language
335
Rangers complaint concluded
338
Fate of posthumous works
341
Loss of ancient writings
343
Scholars journal
349
History of translation
350
History of translation
353
Hard words defended
355
Dick Shifters rural excursion
358
Regulation of memory 362
365
Memory rarely deficient
367
Gelaleddin of Bassora
370
False criticisms on painting
373
Easy writing
376
Steady Snug Startle Solid and Misty
379
Grand style of painting
383
Ladies journey to London
385
Indians speech to his countrymen
388
Scruple Wormwood Sturdy and Gentle
395
Biography liow best performed
398
Books multiplied by useless compilations
401
Miss Heartless want of a lodging
403
Amazonian bravery revived
406
What have ye done?
409
Physical evil moral good
411
Rhetorical action considered
414
Sufficiency of the English language
417
Nature of cunning
420
Sam Softlys history
422
Obstructions of learning
425
Tim Wainscots son a fine gentleman
427
Hacho of Lapland
430
Narratives of travellers considered
433
Sophia Heedful
437
The good sort of woman
440
Omars plan of life
443
Authors inattentive to themselves
446
Horrour of the last
448

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Page 81 - he that is rich is honoured, he that is poor may keep his poverty secret: are you married '. you have a cheerful house; are you single ? you i " Count o'er the joys thine hours have seen. " Count o'er thy days from anguish free, " And know, whatever thou hast been, " Tis something better not to be.
Page 52 - De Ar. Poet. 412. The youth, who hopes th' Olympic prize to gain. All arts must try, and every toil sustain. FRANCIs. IT is observed by Bacon, that " reading makes a full man, conversation a ready man, and writing an exact man." As Bacon attained to degrees of knowledge scarcely ever reached by any other man, the directions which
Page 93 - Sat. x. 347. Intrust thy fortune to the Pow'rs above : Leave them to manage for thee, and to grant What their unerring wisdom sees the want. In goodness as in greatness they excel: Ah! that we lov'd ourselves but half so well.
Page ii - vi. 126. The gates of hell are open night and day ; Smooth the descent, and easy is the way : But to return and view the cheerful skies ; In this the task and mighty labour lies.
Page 80 - xxxv. 28. In the graphic page of the Roman historian, as in the stanzas of the " Ariosto of the North :" " From shingles grey the lances start, " The bracken bush sends forth the dart,
Page 369 - strength or swiftness, we always determine concerning its beauty, before we exert our understanding to judge of its fitness. From what has been said, it may be inferred, that the works of nature, if we compare one species with another, are all equally beautiful; and that preference is given from custom, or
Page 356 - those limits ; and I think I have seen figures of him of which it was very difficult to determine whether they were in the highest degree sublime or extremely ridiculous. Such faults may be said to be the ebullitions of genius; but at least he had this merit,
Page 408 - mortals hope or imagine, which the master of this palace has not obtained ? The dishes of luxury cover his table, the voice of harmony lulls him in his bowers; he breathes the fragrance of the groves of Java, and sleeps upon the down of the cygnets of
Page 103 - nemo supremaque funera debet. OViD. Met. Lib. iii. 135. But no frail man, however great or high, Can be concluded blest before he die. ADDiSON. THE numerous miseries of human life have extorted in all ages an universal complaint. The wisest of men terminated all his experiments in search of happiness, by the mournful confession, that " all is vanity;
Page 248 - N. 41. SATURDAY, JANUARY 27, 1759. THE following letter relates to an affliction perhaps not necessary to be imparted to the publick ; but I could not persuade myself to suppress it, because I think, I know the sentiments to be sincere, and I feel no disposition to provide for this day any other entertainment. At,

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