The Eclectic Magazine: Foreign Literature, Volume 39

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Page 120 - The poorest man may in his cottage bid defiance to all the forces of the crown. It may be frail, its roof may shake, the wind may blow through it, the storm may enter, the rain may enter—but the King of England cannot enter ! All his
Page 162 - be such frigid philosophy as may conduct us indifferent and unmoved over any ground which has been dignified by wisdom, bravery or virtue ;" and, go where he would, his memory was stored with every description of image or incident, that could evoke or
Page 285 - of its founders, and the first mention of the name Coliseum occurs in the fragments of the Venerable Bede, who records the famous prophecy of the Anglo-Saxon pilgrims : 'While stands the Coliseum, Rome shall stand: When falls the Coliseum, Rome shall fall ; And when Rome falls, the world.
Page 165 - beneath her petticoat, Like little mice stole in and out, As if they feared the light." The illustrated edition of " Italy" was, we believe, the first instance in which (since Boydell's time) first class artists were engaged without regard to expense for such a purpose. It was speedily followed by a corresponding edition of the " Poems ;" and every succeeding reprint of
Page 286 - I stood within the Coliseum's wall, Midst the chief relics of almighty Rome; The trees which grew along the broken arche* Waved dark in the blue midnight, and the star» Shone through the rents of ruin ; from afar The watchdog bay'd beyond the Tiber ; and More near from out the Caesars
Page 396 - in length —the work of his own hands—that very " optic glass," through which the " Tuscan Artist" viewed the moon, " At evening from the top of Fesole Or in Valdarno, to descry new lands, Rivers, or mountains, in her spotty globe"— that poor
Page 120 - all the forces of the crown. It may be frail, its roof may shake, the wind may blow through it, the storm may enter, the rain may enter—but the King of England cannot enter ! All his force dares not cross the threshold of the ruined tenement.
Page 154 - From vulgar bounds with brave disorder part, And snatch a grace beyond the reach of art" Nor have many schools retained their influence longer ; for Crabbe was wittily described as " Pope in worsted stockings ;" and the spell was not completely broken
Page 542 - May never guid luck be their fa' ! It's guid to be merry and wise, It's guid to be honest and true, It's guid to support Caledonia's cause, And bide by the buff and the blue. " Here's a health to them that's awa, Here's a health to them that's awa ; Here's a health to Charlie, the chief o
Page 157 - Pour round her path a stream of living light ; And gild those pure and perfect realms of flight, rest, Where virtue triumphs, and her sons are blest." These are the lines which Mackintosh, thereby giving the measure of his own poetic feeling, used to say were equal to the closing

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