English and Scottish Ballads, Volume 2

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Francis James Child
Little, Brown, 1860 - Ballads, English

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This appears to be volume 3, not 2

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Page 61 - In behint yon auld fail dyke, I wot there lies a new-slain knight; And naebody kens that he lies there But his hawk, his hound, and his lady fair. 'His hound is to the hunting gane, His hawk to fetch the wild-fowl hame, His lady's ta'en another mate, So we may mak our dinner sweet. 'Ye'll sit on his white hause-bane, And I'll pick out his bonnie blue e'en: Wi' ae lock o' his gowden hair We'll theek our nest when it grows bare.
Page 152 - O whare will I get a skeely skipper, To sail this new ship of mine ? " — O up and spake an eldern knight, Sat at the King's right knee, — " Sir Patrick Spens is the best sailor That ever sailed the sea.
Page 153 - And sent it to Sir Patrick Spens, Was walking on the strand. " To Noroway, to Noroway, To Noroway o'er the faem ; The king's daughter of Noroway 'Tis thou maun bring her hame.
Page 151 - Late late yestreen I saw the new moone, Wi the auld moone in hir arme, And I feir, I feir, my deir master, That we will cum to harme." O our Scots nobles wer richt laith To weet their cork-heild schoone ; Bot lang owre a' the play wer playd, Thair hats they swam aboone.
Page 130 - You must be father and mother both, And uncle all in one ; God...
Page 150 - O wha is this has don this deid, This ill deid don to me, To send me out this time o' the yeir, To sail upon the se!
Page 62 - Knight ; And naebody kens that he lies there, But his hawk, his hound, and lady fair. ' His hound is to the hunting gane, His hawk to fetch the wild-fowl hame, His lady's ta'en another mate, So we may mak our dinner sweet. ' Ye'll sit on his white hause-bane, And I'll pick out his bonny blue een : Wi' ae lock o' his gowden hair We'll theek our nest when it grows bare.
Page 135 - You that executors be made, And overseers eke Of children that be fatherless, And infants mild and meek ; Take you example by this thing, And yield to each his right, Lest God with such like miserye Your wicked minds requite.
Page 154 - Our gude ship sails the morn." " Now ever alake, my master dear, I fear a deadly storm ! " I saw the new moon, late yestreen, Wi' the auld moon in her arm ; And if we gang to sea, master, I fear we'll come to harm.
Page 132 - Murder's heart relent : And they that undertooke the deed, Full sore did now repent. I Yet one of them more hard of heart, Did vowe to do his charge, Because the wretch, that hired him, Had paid him very large. The other won't agree thereto, So here they fall to strife ; With one another they did fight, About the...

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