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Books Books 1 - 10 of 36 on As soon as they were grown up to be men, the civil war broke out, in which our two....
" As soon as they were grown up to be men, the civil war broke out, in which our two friends took... "
A history military and municipal of the ancient borough of Devizes [by H. Bull]. - Page 289
by Henry Bull (of Devizes.) - 1859
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The Spectator, Volume 4

1738
...Severity of ' the Mailer was too well known for the Criminal to ex' pedl any Pardon for fuch a Fault ; fo that the Boy, who ' was of a meek Temper, was terrified to Death at the ' Thoughts of his Appearance, when his Friend, who fat ' next to him, bade him be of good Cheer, for...
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The Spectator, Volume 4

1778
...rity of the mafter was too well known for the criminal ' to expect any pardon for fuch a fault ; fo that the boy, ' who was of a meek temper, was terrified to death at ' the thoughts of his appearance, when his friend who ' fat next to him, bade him be of good cheer, for that...
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The Addisonian miscellany, a selection from the Spectator, Tatler, and ...

Joseph Addison, Spectator (The) - 1801
...I'cyerity oi the mafter was too well known for the criminal to cxpect any pardon for fuch a fault s fo that the boy, who was of a meek temper, was terrified to death at the thoughts of his appearance, when his friend, who fat nepct to him, bade him he of good cheer, for that...
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The British Essayists: The Spectator

Alexander Chalmers - English essays - 1802
...above-mentioned curtain. The severity of the master* was too well known for the criminal to expect any pardon for such a fault ; so that the boy, who was of a meek temper, was terrified to death at the thoughts of his appearance, when his friend who sat next to him bade him be of good cheer, for that...
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Select British Classics, Volume 14

English literature - 1803
...above-mentioned curtain : ' the severity of the master wg.s. too well known fop ' the criminal to expect any pardon for such a fault ; ' so that the boy, who was...of a meek temper, was ' terrified to death at the thoughts of his appearance, ' when his friend who sat next to him, bade him be ' of good cheer, for...
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Selections from the Spectator, Tatler, Guardian, and Freeholder: Selections ...

Joseph Addison, Sir Richard Steele - English essays - 1804
...abovementioned Curtain. The severity of the master was too well known for the crirniwal to expect any pardon for such a fault ; so that the boy, who was of a meek temper, was terrified to death at the thoughts of his appearance; when his friend who sat next to him bade him b? of good cheer, for that...
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The Spectator; in Miniature: Being a Collection of the Principal ..., Volume 1

1808 - 288 pages
...master was too well known for the criminal to expect any pardon for such a fanlt ; so that Ihe hoy, who was of a meek temper, was terrified to death at the thoughts of his appearance, when his friend, who sal next to him, hade him he of good cheer, for that...
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The Spectator, Volume 6

Joseph Addison, Sir Richard Steele - English essays - 1810
...above-mentioned curtain. The severity of the master* was too well known for the criminal to expect any pardon for such a fault ; so that the boy, who was of a meek temper, was terrified to death at the thoughts of his appearance, when his friend who sat next to him bade him be of good cheer, for that...
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The Spectator, Volume 5

Alexander Chalmers - English essays - 1810
...curtain: the severity of the master was too well known for the criminal to expect any pardon for sucli a fault ; so that the boy, who was of a meek temper, was terrified to death at the thoughts of his appearance ; when his friend who sat next to him, bade him be of good cheer, for that...
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Elegant extracts: a copious selection of passages from the most eminent ...

Elegant extracts - 1812
...the master was too well known for the criminal to expect any pardon for such a fault ; so that tiie boy, who was of a meek temper, was terrified to death at the thoughts of his appearance ; when his friend, who sat next to him, hade him lv of good cheer, for...
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