Travels and Discoveries in North and Central Africa: Being a Journal of an Expedition Undertaken Under the Auspices of H. B. M.'s Government, in the Years 1849-1855, Volume 3

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Drallop Publishing Company, 1859 - Africa, Central

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Page 171 - In a noble unbroken stream, though here, where it has become contracted, only about 700 yards broad, hemmed in on this side by a rocky bank of from twenty to thirty feet in elevation, the great river of Western Africa (whose name, under whatever form it may appear, whether Dhiuliba, Mayo, Eghirreu, I'sa, Kwara, or Baki-n-niwa, means nothing but
Page 302 - I could see clay houses of different characters, some low and unseemly, others rising with a second story in front to greater elevation, and making even an attempt at architectural ornament, the whole being interrupted by a few round huts of matting. The sight of this spectacle afforded me sufficient matter of interest, although, the streets being very narrow, only little was to be seen of the intercourse carried on in them, with the exception of the small market in the northern quarter, which was...
Page 302 - Jmgere-ber, was seen from this point; but towards the east the view extended over a wide expanse of the desert, and towards the south the elevated mansions of the Ghadamsiye merchants were visible. The style of the buildings was various. I could see clay houses of different characters, some low and unseemly, others rising with a second story in front to greater elevation, and making even an attempt at architectural ornament, the whole being interrupted by a few round huts of matting. The sight of...
Page 358 - There is, however, a very considerable degree of industry exercised by the natives of some of the neighbouring districts, especially Fermagha, who produce very excellent woollen blankets, and carpets of various colours, which form a most extensive article of consumption with the natives. The foreign commerce has especially three great high roads : that along the river from the south-west (for lower down the river there is at present scarcely any commerce at all), which comprise the trade proceeding...
Page 358 - I was obliged to give away, as a present, a specimen which I intended to bring home with me. The people of Timbuktu are very experienced in the art of adorning their clothing with a fine stitching of silk, but this is done on a very small scale, and even these shirts are only used at home.
Page 629 - ... to reach Timbuktu, and to explore that part of the Niger which, through the untimely fate of Mungo Park, had remained unknown to the scientific world. In this enterprise I succeeded to my utmost expectation, and not only made known the whole of that vast region, which even to the Arab merchants in general had remained more unknown than any other part of Africa, but I succeeded also in establishing friendly relations with all the most powerful chiefs along the river up to that mysterious city...
Page 357 - Timbuktu from that of Kano is the fact that Timbuktu is not at all a manufacturing town, while the emporium of Hausa fully deserves to be classed as such. Almost the whole life of the city is based upon foreign commerce, which, owing to the great northerly bend of the Niger, finds here the most...
Page 210 - ... pointing my gun, he begged me to ride quietly in advance straight upon those people, and at the same time cried out to them that I was a sherif, and a friend of the Sheikh El Bakay, to whom I was carrying a number of books from the East. All of a sudden they dropped their spears and thronged round me, requesting me to give them my blessing; and the circumstances under which I was placed obliged me to comply with this slight request, although it was by no means a pleasant matter to lay my hands...
Page 357 - Some of these articles, such as provision or luggage-bags, cushions, small leather pouches for tobacco, and gun-cloths, especially the leather bags, are very neat ; but even these are mostly manufactured by Tawarek, and especially females, so that the industry of the city is hardly of any account.
Page 300 - ... guest Barth was to be, no one should be allowed to see him, still numbers of people gained access to his house, and gave no small trouble by their inquisitiveness, the annoyance of which was farther increased by the traveller's serious indisposition. On the very first day of his arrival he learned that Hammadi, the rival and enemy of El Bakay, had informed the Fulbe,- or Fullan, that a Christian had entered the town, and that, in consequence, they had come to the determination of killing him....

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