The Spectator

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Contents

Reflections on Bills of MortalityStory of a Dervise
193
293 Connexion betwixt Prudence and good Fortune Fable of a Drop in the Ocean
198
Letter on PinMoneyReflections on that Custom
203
Letter from Sir John Envil married to a Woman of Quality
208
Project of the new French Political Academy 30 Remarks on Fortunestealerson Widows
218
On waste of TimeJournal of a Citizen 323 Clarindas Journal of a week 329 Visit with Sir Roger de Coverley to Westminster Abbey
233
Sir Roger de Coverley at the Theatre
239
Consolation and Intrepidity in Death
252
Use to be made of Enemies
256
Letter on CatcallsHistory of them
259
Various Advantages of the SpectatorsPaperPrinting
263
Humorous way of sorting Companiesfor Mirthfor useful Purposes
267
Bill of Mortality of Lovers
271
Cheerfulness preferable to Mirth
274
Sir Roger de Coverleys Visit to Spring Gardens
279
Motives to Cheerfulness
283
On pious GratitudePoem on it
417
Proposal for a Newspaper of Whispers
421
On true and false Modesty
424
On religious Faith and Practice 463 Weight of Wisdom and Riches a Vision
432
Mediocrity of Fortune to be preferred 465 Means of strengthening Faith
441
469 On Benevolence in official Situations 470 CriticismSpecimen of various Readings
448
On religious Hope
452
On asking Advice in affairs of Love
456
On Method in Writing and ConversationCharacters of Tom Puzzle and Will Dry
459
Letter on Gardening
462
Opinions on the Dispute between Count Rechtern and M Mesnager
466
Letters from Henpeckt Husbandsfrom a Woman mar ried to a Cotquean
471
On attributing our Neighbours Misfortunes to Judg ments
472
Essay on Dreams
477
On the Price and Success of the Spectator
482

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Page 68 - OF man's first disobedience, and the fruit Of that forbidden tree, whose mortal taste Brought death into the world, and all our woe, With loss of Eden, till one greater Man Restore us, and regain the blissful seat, Sing, heavenly Muse...
Page 152 - And another angel came and stood at the altar, having a golden censer, and there was given unto him much incense, that he should offer it with the prayers of all saints upon the golden altar which was before the throne. And the smoke of the incense, which came with the prayers of the saints, ascended up before God out of the angel's hand.
Page 455 - I have set the Lord always before me: Because he is at my right hand, I shall not be moved. Therefore my heart is glad, and my glory rejoiceth: My flesh also shall rest in hope. For thou wilt not leave my soul in hell ; l Neither wilt thou suffer thine Holy One to see corruption. Thou wilt show me the path of life: In thy presence is fulness of joy ; At thy right hand there are pleasures for evermore.
Page 394 - THE Lord my pasture shall prepare, And feed me with a shepherd's care ; His presence shall my wants supply, And guard me with a watchful eye ; My noon-day walks he shall attend, And all my midnight hours defend.
Page 70 - Hail horrors, hail Infernal world, and thou profoundest Hell Receive thy new possessor; one who brings A mind not to be changed by place or time.
Page 155 - So many grateful altars I would rear Of grassy turf, and pile up every stone Of lustre from the brook, in memory, Or monument to ages ; and thereon Offer sweet-smelling gums, and fruits, and flowers.
Page 645 - I knew a man in Christ above fourteen years ago, (whether in the body, I cannot tell ; or whether out of the body, I cannot tell : God knoweth ;) such an one caught up to the third heaven.
Page 394 - Though in the paths of death I tread, With gloomy horrors overspread, My steadfast heart shall fear no ill, For thou, O Lord, art with me still ; Thy friendly crook shall give me aid, And guide me through the dreadful shade.
Page 139 - So saying, her rash hand in evil hour Forth reaching to the Fruit, she pluck'd, she eat: Earth felt the wound, and Nature from her seat Sighing through all her Works gave signs of woe, That all was lost.
Page 102 - My beloved spake, and said unto me, Rise up, my love, my fair one, and come away. For, lo, the winter is past, The rain is over and gone ; The flowers appear on the earth ; The time of the singing of birds is come, And the voice of the turtle is heard in our land ; The fig tree putteth forth her green figs, And the vines with the tender grape give a good smell. Arise, my love, my fair one, and come away.