Downsizing Democracy: How America Sidelined Its Citizens and Privatized Its Public

Front Cover

In Downsizing Democracy, Matthew A. Crenson and Benjamin Ginsberg describe how the once powerful idea of a collective citizenry has given way to a concept of personal, autonomous democracy. Today, political change is effected through litigation, lobbying, and term limits, rather than active participation in the political process, resulting in narrow special interest groups dominating state and federal decision-making. At a time when an American's investment in the democratic process has largely been reduced to an annual contribution to a political party or organization, Downsizing Democracy offers a critical reassessment of American democracy.

 

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Contents

Chapter I
1
Chapter 2
20
Chapter 3
47
Chapter 4
80
Chapter 7
90
Chapter
106
The Jurisprudence of Personal Democracy
152
Movements without Members
182
Chapter 9
198
Chapter 10
234
Chapter 6
253
Index
285
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

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Matthew A. Crenson is a professor of political science at the Johns Hopkins University whose books include Building the Invisible Orphanage and Neighborhood Politics. Benjamin Ginsberg is the David Bernstein Professor of Political Science and director of the Center for the Study of American Government at the Johns Hopkins University. His books include Politics by Other Means and American Government: Freedom and Power.