Portraits, Memoirs, and Characters, of Remarkable Persons, from the Revolution in 1688 to the End of the Reign of George II.: Collected from the Most Authentic Accounts Extant, Volume 3

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Page 12 - I stand indicted at your lordship's bar, and have heard what is called evidence adduced in support of such a charge, I very humbly solicit your lordship's patience, and beg the hearing of this respectable audience, while I, single and unskilful, destitute of friends and unassisted by counsel, say something, perhaps like argument, in my defence. I shall consume but little of your lordship's time : what I have to say will be short ; and this brevity, probably, will be the best part of it : however,...
Page 11 - My lord," began Aram, in that remarkable defence still extant, and still considered as wholly unequalled from the lips of one defending his own cause;—" my lord, I know not whether it is of right, or through some indulgence of your lordship, that I am allowed the liberty at this bar, and at this time, to attempt a defence; incapable and uninstructed as I am to speak. Since, while I see so many eyes upon me, so numerous and awful a concourse, fixed with attention, and filled with I know not what...
Page 15 - William Thompson, for all the vigilance of this place, in open daylight, and doubleironed, made his escape ; and, notwithstanding an immediate inquiry set on foot, the strictest search, and all advertisement, was never seen or heard of since.
Page 188 - HERE continueth to rot The Body of FRANCIS CHARTRES, Who, with an INFLEXIBLE CONSTANCY, and INIMITABLE UNIFORMITY of Life, PERSISTED, In spite of AGE and INFIRMITIES, In the Practice of EVERY HUMAN VICE, Excepting PRODIGALITY and HYPOCRISY : His insatiable AVARICE exempted him from the first, His matchless IMPUDENCE from the second.
Page 13 - Again, my lord, a suspicion of this kind, which nothing but malevolence could entertain...
Page 16 - ... past, being not only places of religious retirement, but of burial too: and it has scarce or never been heard of, but that every cell now known contains or contained these relics of humanity, some mutilated and some entire. I do not inform, but give me leave to remind your Lordship that here sat solitary Sanctity...
Page 18 - What would have been said, what believed, if this had been an accident to the bones in question...
Page 11 - I see so many eyes upon me, so numerous and awful a concourse fixed with attention and filled with I know not what expectancy, I labour not with guilt, my lord, but with perplexity ; for having never seen a court but this, being wholly unacquainted with law, the customs of the bar, and all judiciary proceedings, I fear I shall be so little capable of speaking with propriety in this place, that it exceeds my hope if I shall be able to speak at all. " I have heard, my lord, the indictment read, wherein...
Page 77 - As to his dimensions, he was five feet nine inches and a half high. His body, round the chest, just under the arms, measured five feet six inches, and round the belly six feet eleven inches. His arm, in the middle of it, was two feet two inches about, and his leg two feet eight inches. He had always a good appetite, and, when a youth, used to eat somewhat remarkably; but of late years, though he continued to eat heartily...
Page 20 - ... chance exposed ? And might not a place where bones lay be mentioned by a person by chance as well as found by a labourer by chance ? Or is it more criminal accidentally to name where bones lie, than accidentally to find where they lie?

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