Personal Styles in Early Cycladic Sculpture

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University of Wisconsin Pres, Aug 13, 2013 - Art - 360 pages
Annotation "Personal Styles in Early Cycladic Sculpture represents the culmination of thirty-five years of study. Pat Getz-Gentle offers here much new material and many fresh insights into a tradition, rooted in the Neolithic period, that spanned most of the third millennium B.C. She begins with a review of this tradition, placing particular emphasis on the stages leading to the reclining figure with folded arms that is the unique and quintessential icon of the early Bronze Age culture at the center of the Aegean. She then focuses on the styles of fifteen sculptors, several of whom are identified and discussed for the first time in this volume. By introducing little-known pieces attributable to these sculptors, she illuminates various phases of their artistic development."--BOOK JACKET. Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
 

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Contents

Cycladic Sculpture from the Late Neolithic through the Transitional Early Cycladic III Phase
3
Cycladic Sculpture of the Early Cycladic II Period
29
Chapter 3 Sculptors of Early Cycladic I Plastiras Figures
61
Chapter 4 Sculptors of Early Cycladic II Reclining FoldedArm Figures
67
Taking the Measure of Early Cycladic II Spedos Variety Figures by Jack de Vries
109
Abbreviations
127
Notes
131
Checklists of Twenty Sculptors
151
Notes on the Plates
173
Notes on the Text Figures
179
Addendum
183
Illustration Sources
189
Illustration Credits
193
Index
195
Plates
197
Copyright

Bibliography
171

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About the author (2013)

Pat Getz-Gentle is the author of Early Cycladic Sculpture, Sculptors of the Cyclades, and Stone Vessels of the Cyclades in the Early Bronze Age as well as the principal author of Early Cycladic Art in North American Collections. An independent scholar with a PhD from Harvard University, she lives in New Haven, Connecticut. Jack de Vries is a lecturer in art history who lives in Alkmaar, Holland.

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