Junius: Including Letters by the Same Writer, Under Other Signatures, (now First Collected.)

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Bradford and Inskeep, 1813 - Great Britain
 

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Page 194 - Born and educated in this country, I glory in the name of Briton ; and the peculiar happiness of my life will ever consist in promoting the welfare of a people, whose loyalty and warm affection to me I consider as the greatest and most permanent security of my throne...
Page 146 - YOU are so little accustomed to receive any marks of respect or esteem from the public, that if, in the following lines, a compliment or expression of applause should escape me, I fear you would consider it as a mockery of your established character, and, perhaps, an insult to your understanding.
Page 52 - Junius would be of service to Lord Chatham. My vote will hardly recommend him to an increase of his pension, or to a seat in the cabinet. But if his ambition be upon a level with his understanding — if he judges of what is truly honourable...
Page 66 - I stood near him; and his face, to use the expression of the scripture of the first martyr, " his face was as if it had been the face of an angel." I do not know how others feel ; but if I had stood in that situation, I never would have exchanged it for all that kings in their profusion could bestow.
Page 207 - Without consulting your minister, call together your whole council. Let it appear to the public, that you can determine and act for yourself. Come forward to your people. Lay aside the wretched formalities of a king; and speak to your subjects with the spirit of a man, and in the language of a gentleman. Tell them you have been fatally deceived.
Page 68 - He was bred to the law, which is, in my opinion, one of the first and noblest of human sciences, — a science which does more to quicken and invigorate the understanding than all tho other kinds of learning put together ; but it is not apt, except in persons very happily born, to open and to liberalize the mind exactly in the same proportion.
Page 2 - If an honest, and, I may truly affirm, a laborious zeal for the public service, has given me any weight in your esteem, let me exhort and conjure you, never to suffer an invasion of your political constitution, however minute the instance may appear, to pass by, without a determined persevering resistance.
Page 67 - Long may we tread the same road together ; whoever may accompany us, or whoever may laugh at us on our journey ! I honestly and solemnly declare, I have in all seasons adhered to the system of 1766, for no other reason, than that I think it laid deep in your truest interests — and that, by limiting the exercise, it fixes, on the firmest foundations, a real, consistent, well-grounded authority in parliament. Until you come back to that system, there will be no peace for England.
Page 32 - As for myself, be assured that I am far above all pecuniary views, and no other person, I think, has any claim to share with you. Make the most of it therefore, and let all your views in life be directed to a solid, however moderate, independence, Without it no man can be happy, or even honest.
Page 218 - Majesty to give the answer to a late humble address, remonstrance, and petition, of the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Livery of the city of London, in Common Hall assembled, is were negatived, and a previous question put on all the rest.

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