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After a few words from the Lord Advo- repeal. There were still persons at work, cate of Scotland, Lord A. Hamilton, and from in the Metropolis, and elsewhere, endeaMessrs. Bennet and Brougham, the Address vouring to excite disaffection; but there was carried unanimously.

was nothing in their attempts that could

not be put down by the vigour of the Law, HOUSB Up Lords, Jan. 28., the vigilance of the Government, and the Viscount Sidmouth presented a Bill for loyalty and activity of the Magistracy. repealing the Habeas Corpus Suspension The Noble Lord had alluded to the proseAct, which was read the first time. His cutions of Mr. Hone. With regard to Lordship then moved to suspend tbe stand. these, he rejected with indigoation all im. ing orders (forbiilding the passing a Bill putation of base motives (for hypocrisy he through more than one stage in the same considered to be a base motive); and placed day) with reference to this Bill. Ordered. the prosecutions upon the general feelOn the second reading of the Bill, the pre, ings against Parodies of that description. amble was read, which, after reciting the The Bill was then read a second time, titles of the two Acts, one suspending the the Commitment negatived, and the Bill Habeas Corpus till the 1st of July last, ordered to be engrossed. The engrossed and the other continuiug the suspension Bill was brought into the House almost till the 1st of March next, stated that the immediately. was then read the third continuance of the powers thus granted time, and passed ; and ordered to be sent was no longer necessary.

to the Commons. Lord Holland said, that neither in the Trials that had taken place in the Metro

In the Commons, the same day, Lord polis, at Derby, or in Scotland, had any

Castlereugh, after an introductory speech, necessity been proved to exist for the sus

moved Addresses of condoleace to the pension of the Act. There was no prco,

Queen and to Prince Leopold, on the loss in any of the cases that had occurred, of which the Royal Family and the Country any insurrection, that did not appear to

had sustained in the death of the late Prin, have been fomented by the agents or the cess Charlotte of Wales. spies of Government. After alluding to the trials of Mr. Hone for blasphemous

On the question being put for an Address

to the Queen, Mr. Calcraft said, he should, Parodies, and giving it as bis Lordship’s though with pain, give his negative to the opinion that, had those Parodies been di

motion, and should at the same time best rected against the Opposition or Reformers, discharge bis duty by not assigoing reano prosecution would have been instituted;

sons for his conduct. the Noble Lord concluded with declaring,

Mr. M. A. Taylor also expressed a simi. that he felt it to be his duty to deliver his

lar determination, and was followed by opinion in condemnation of the measures

other Gentlemen. No numerical division which had been resorted to, without any

took place on the subject; but it is readequate reason, and upon asserted infor.

markable that Mr. Speaker, when the cries mation, which he was satisfied could not stand the test of real inquiry.

of Aye and No had been repeated from all Viscount Sidmouth declared, that he was

parts of the House, adopted that form of unconscious of any harsh or cruel exer

words which is expressive of doubi, and

usually leads to a division; " and the cise of the powers entrusted to Ministers

Ayes, I think,” said be (casting a glauce under this Act. The responsibility of its execution rested, of course, chiefly with

over the House, and speaking hesitatiogly)

" the Ayes, I think, have it." himself; and he could say that he had

The motion was then declared to be caranxiously endeavoured to do his duty- ried in the affirmative; and Mr. Disbrowe that he had acted, to the best of his judgmeut, leniently, but firmly--that he had in

was appointed to carry it to the Queen. view only to prevent the threatened danger, and had not been the means of depriving

Jan. 29. individuals of liberty any further than as

A Bill to repeal the Act for the Suspen. the necessity of the case required. The sion of the Habea: Corpus was brought from improvement in the condition of ihe lower the other House, and read the first time. classes, he was happy to say, rendered On the second reading, some conversathe further continuance of the Act unne

tion took place. Lord Folkestone said, cessary; and although there was no prece that, as far as he could form a judgment, dent upon the Records of Parliament for the persons confined on mere suspicion, repealing an Act of this description, all of and discharged recently on recognizances, them having been suffered to expire, yet had been unjustiy treated. He could uot he was of opinion that, the necessity having see the right so to bind them by recognizceased, the Act ought not to be allowed to continue any longer; and therefore, al That right was strenuously maintained though the period till jis expiration was by the ttorney and Solicitor-Generais, very short, he had deterininod to move its Lord Castlereagh, and Mr. B. Bathurst.

ances.

HISTORICAL CHRONICLE.

PROCEEDINGS IN PARLIAMENT.
House of Lords, Jan. 27,

refrain from alluding to the late three sucThe customary Address to the Prince cessive trials. 'Mr. Hone's able defence Regent was moved by the Earl of Aylesford, of himself convinced him, as it had conand was seconded by the Lord Selsey. vinced tlıree Juries, that he had been Both of these Noblemen, after dilating on guilty of no legal offence. But why was the general grief evinced by the Nation on the prosecution continued after a Jury had the loss of the Princess Charlotte, congra pronounced a verdict of acquittal ? tulated the House on the information that (Hear, hear!)-A Jury was the only comthe prospects of the Country were bright- petent tribunal to say what was or was not a ening : our commerce, foreigo and do Libel. The Judge had given bis own opinion, mestic, was rapidly improving; our reve in opposition to the Jury, the only compe. due was increasing ; and public credit tent authority.-(Hear, hear.) --The opi.. stood again on the most satisfactory and nion of the Judge was not desired at all on unshaken basis.

such a question. The evil of prosecutions Earl Stanhope would condemn a factious of this sort was great indeed; but it was opposition to those Ministers who had not to be compared with the evil of desteered the vessel of state in safety through stroying the confidence of the Country in a storm unparalleled in difficulty and dan the Trial by Jury.- (Hear, hear, hear.) ger. Under the present Administration The Attorney General said, that all three the principles of anarchy and insubordi. Parodies were Libels upon sacred subjects nation, so dangerous to society, had been of the Church-service. The object of the more effectually opposed than ever. Ad prosecution was not punishment, but the verting to the military occupation of prevention of the circulation of the writings France, his Lordship stigmatised the French prosecuted. It was his deliberale opinion, as " the most unprincipled people on the that he was bound to proceed, unless be globe-a

- a people who had pursued the ca were convinced, by the verdict of Not reer of slaves and robbers, and were now guilty in the one trial, that the defeudanı the most abject of the human race.” He was not guilty of the other two Libels. knew from conversation with the Duke of Sir Samuel Romilly condemned the susOtranto, better known by the name of pension of the Habeas Corpus; and conFouche, that it was his opinion, the instant tended, from the proceedings on the trials Buonaparte was set loose, the Bourbons at Derby, and from the release of many of would cease to reign, and the fall of that the Manchester prisoners as far back as family would ensure a war against the rest September, that ihe conspiracies so much of Europe ; and the renewal of such a talked of by Ministers had no existence, contest as that we had lately been engaged prior to the passing of the Suspension Bill; in must be attended with inevitable de. but were first batched about the beginning struction to this country.

of June, at the instigation of Government The Marquis of Lansdowne would not emissaries. The prosecution against Hone propose any amendment, though he could was a part of that system on which Minis. concur with only that part of the Address ters came into and remained in office, which related to the death of the Princess But the religious cry had not, on this occaCharlotte. He insisted that no evidence sion, turned to their advantage. He strongof any thing like an organized conspiracy ly censured the Parodies; but observed had been discovered, which called for the that the Attorney-General had absurdly suspension of the Constitution.

begun only to prosecute for them months The Earl of Liverpool shortly replied; after they had been voluntarily suppressed, when the Address was agreed to.

and by his repeated prosecutions had con

trived to produce a convenient little voIn the Commons, the same day, the Jume of such compositions to be handed Speech from the Throne being then taken down to posterity. into consideration, the customary Addiess The Solicitor General contended for the was proposed by Mr. Wodehouse, and accuracy of the statements on which Parseconded by Mr. Windham Quin.

liament had suspended the Habeas Corpus Lord Althorpe agreed with every part of Act; and vindicated the proceedwgs with the Address, excepting that which ascribed regard to Hone. the present tranquillity of the Country to Lord Castlereagh said, that Papers would the measures of Government; yet on that on Mouday be laid before the House, which subject he should not now enter. Delicale would fully justify the measures adopted as was the topick, he could not, however, by the Administration,

After

After a few words from the Lord Advo- repeal. There were still persons at work, cate of Scotland, Lord A. Hamilton, and from in the Metropolis, and elsewhere, endeaMessrs. Bennet and Brougham, the Address vouring to excite disaffection; but there was carried unanimously.

was nothing in their attempts that could

not be put down by the vigour of the Law, House of Lords, Jan. 28.', the vigilance of the Goverament, and the Viscount Sidmouth presented a Bill for loyalty and activity of the Magistracy. repealing the Habeas Corpus Suspension The Noble Lord had alluded to the proseAct, which was read the first time. His cutions of Mr. Hone. With regard to Lordship then moved to suspend the stand these, he rejected with indignation all im. ing orders (forbiilding the passing a Bill putation of base motives (for hypocrisy he through more than one stage in the same considered to be a base motive); and placed day) with reference to this Bill. Ordered. the prosecutions upon the general feelOn the second reading of the Bill, the pre. ings against Parodies of that description. amble was read, which, after reciting the The Bill was then read a second time, titles of the two Acts, one suspending the the Commitment negatived, and the Bill Habeas Corpus till the 1st of July last, ordered to be engrossed. The engrossed and the other continuiug the suspension Bill was brought into the House almost till the 1st of March next, stated that the immediately. It was then read the third continuance of the powers thus grauted time, and passed ; and ordered to be sent was no longer necessary.

to the Commons. Lord Holland said, that neither in the Trials that had taken place in the Metro

In the Commons, the same day, Lord polis, at Derby, or in Scotland, had any

Castlereugh, after an introductory speech, necessity been proved to exist for the sus

moved Addresses of condolence to the pension of the Act. There was no prco,

Queen and to Prince Leopold, on the loss in any of the cases that had occurred, of which the Royal Family and the Country any insurrection, that did not appear to had sustained in the death of the late Prin, have been fomented by the agents or the

cess Charlotte of Wales. spies of Government. After alluding to

On the question being put for an Address the trials of Mr. Hone for blasphemous

to the Queen, Mr. Calcraft said, he should, Parodies, and giving it as bis Lordship’s though with pain, give his negative to the opinion that, had those Parodies been di

motion, and should at the same time best rected against the Opposition or Reformers, discharge bis duty by not assigning reano prosecution would have been justituted;

sons for his conduct. the Noble Lord concluded with declaring,

Mr. M. A. Taylor also expressed a simi, that he felt it to be bis duty to deliver his

lar determination, and was followed by opinion in condemnation of the measures

other Gentlemen. No numerical division which had been resorted to, without any

took place on the subject; but it is readequate reason, and upon asserted infor.

markable that Mr. Speaker, when the cries mation, which he was satisfied could not stand the test of real inquiry.

of Aye and No had been repeated from all Viscount Sidmouth declared, that he was

parts of the House, adopted that form of unconscious of any harsh or cruel exer

words which is expressive of doubi, and

usually leads to a division ; " and the cise of the powers entrusted to Ministers

Ayes, I think,” said he (casting a glauce under this Act. The responsibility of its execution rested, of course, chiefly with

over the House, and speaking besitatiogly)

" the Ayes, I think, have it." himself; and he could say that he had

The moiion was then declared to be caranxiously endeavoured to do his duty

ried in the affirmative ; and Mr. Disbrowe that he had acted, 10 the bent of his judg

was appointed to carry it to the Queen. ment, leniently, but firmly--that he had in view only to prevent the threatened danger, and had not been the means of depriving

Jan. 29. individuals of liberty any further than as A Bill to repeal the Act for the Suspen. the necessity of the case required. The sion of the Habeas Corpus was brought from improvement in the condition of ihe lower the other House, and read the first time. classes, he was happy to say, rendered On the second reading, some conversathe further continuance of the Act unne tion took place. Lord Folkestone said, cessary; and although there was no prece that, as far as he could form a judgment, dent upon the Records of Parliament for the persons confined on mere suspicion, repealing an Act of this description, all of and discharged recently on recogoizances, them having been suffered to expire, yet had been unjustiy treated. He could uot he was of opinion that, the necessity having see the right so to bind them by recognizceased, the Act ought not to be allowed to continue any longer ; and therefore, al That right was strenuously maintained though the period till jis expiration was by the ditorney and Solicitor-Generals, very short, he had determined to move its Lord Castleieagh, and Mr. B. Bathurst.

The

ances.

The Bill was afterwards read the third course to this measure should be found time, and passed.

uecessary, he should then take the op. The Chancellor of the Exchequer, in an portunity of giving his opinion more in swer to Mr. Grenfell, said, that the Bank detail. had made ample preparations for resu. Lord Castlereagh presented several Ps. miog its payments in cash at the period pers, purporting to be communications fixed by Parliament: but the loans now in from the Prince Regent respecting the progress in foreign countries might, by internal state of the Country; these Papossibility, make it a question for the con pers he proposed should be referred to a sideration of Parliament, whether the re Committee, to be appointed on Thursday striction ought to be further continued, the 5th instant. whilst the iminediate effects of such ar Mr. Vansittart, in answer to a question rangements should be in operation.

from Mr. Brougham, stated, that all the

papers connected with the Property Tax House of LORDS, Jan. 31.

had been destroyed. The Royal Assent was given, by Com Mr. W. Smith moved for an account of mission, to the Bill for the repeal of the the sums received at the Crown.office Act of last Session, entitled, An Act for the from Mr. Hone for copies of the informaSuspension of the Habeas Corpus Act. tions filed agaiost him, together with the

authority on which they were demanded, Feb. 2.

and the uses to which they were applied. Viscount Sidmouth presented certain Pa In considering the recent prosecutions ina pers relative to the past and present state stituted against Mr. Hone, he could not of the Country. His Lordship would not help admiring the intrepidity, sagacity, then move for the appointment of a Secret and skill, with which he had conducted Committee to examine, owing to the all his own defence. He had since had an sence of Lord Holland and the Marquis of opportunity of conversing with him in Lansdowne, who were prevented from at private ; and he must declare, that he distending by the death of the Earl of Upper covered nothing that could tend to give Ossory.

him an unfavourable impression of his Feb. 3.

character, nothing unbecoming the manLord Sidmouth moved the appointment vers of a gentleman. As for the Parodies of a Committee; which was opposed by the published by Mr. Hone, his opinion perEarl of Carnarvon and the Marquis of tectly coincided with that of the publick Lunsdowne, o: the ground that it would be in general, that they were highly censura mere mockery to confine the inquiry to abje ; and, it was not the least honourable the Papers furnished by Ministers thein part of Mr. Hone's conduct, that, immeselves; that information of a very differ diately on finding that such was the pub. ent character was requisite; and that the lic impression respecting them, he used Committee should not only be appointed every means to preveni the circulation. in a manner different from what it had But those Parodies, however censurable, been heretofore, but that it should have were not a fit subject to be animadverted latitude of inquiry, and a power of ex on in a Court of Justice. It appeared to amining wiinesses, or calling for evidence, himn that the free operation of public opifar beyond the mere reference of Papers ' nion was the only adequate and proper furnished by theinselves. The Secret check to their popularity. Committees of last Session, their Lord. The Allorney General opposed the moships observed, had made their report tion, as Mr. Hone had paid no fees but upon ex-parte evidence - and upoo ex. sueh as had been paid in similar cases parte evidence Ministers might get what since the year 1693. He would not ob. Report they pleased.

ject, if a proper ground was laid for it, to The Papers were then referred to a Com. a motion for a general relurn of the fees. mittee of Secrecy · - to consist of seven After some remarks by Sir F. Burdett, Lords, to be chosen by bailot.

Lord Castlereagh, Mr. Bathurst, and Lord

Folkestone, Mr. Smith withdrew his motion, In the Commons, the same day, on the to renew it in a different shape. motion of Lord Castlereagh, the Finance Committee of last Session was revived.

Feb. 4. On the motion of Mr. Grenfell, who L'rd Folkestone made some observaurged the impolicy of continuing the re tions où recent alterations in the mode of striction on cash payments, various re proceeding in the House, as to the manturns respecting the affairs of the Bank ner of publishing the Votes. The change were ordered.

was in some respects convenient; but he Mr. Vansiltart said, that as to the re saw objections as to the not printing of striction, he had alluded to it on a former Petition“, unless the printing of them was pight as a measure merely probable. !, ordered by vote. The printing of those bowever, it should so turn out that re Peritono certainly tended to delay the

pub.

publication of the Votes; yet it was pos Lord Castlereagh observed, that great sible that it might be injurious to the peo- good had already been done by the Comple, and therefore he regretted its ten mittee; and much benefit might result dency in that way. The printing of the froin further discussion and inquiry, by Votes of the House was the oply regular ascertaining principles, and suggestiog way in which their proceedings were made improvements, which would be acted upon public to the Country at large. He should in the several parishes, although no ledo no more thau mention the circum gislative act should pass on the subject. stance, hoping that the House would ne The Committee was re-appointed. ver be inațieptive to Petitioners.

Sir F. Burdett presented Petitions from The House then went into a Committee Bath and other places, for Parliamentary of Supply; in which, on the motion of Sir Reform. G. Warrender, 20,000 seamen were voted Lord Binning brought in a Bill to esta. for the present year; 611,0001. for pay ; blish Lunatic Asylums in Scotland ; and 520,0001. for victuals, &c.; and a sum for Mr. W. Wynn, a Bilt to regulate Elecwear and tear.

tion Polis. On the motion of Mr. Vansittart, an Mr. W. Smith made his promised moissue of Exchequer Bills to the amount of tion, for an account of all fees taken by 25,000,0001. was voted ; to pay off out the Clerks of the Crown-office for office standing bills. Mr. V. observed, that copies of informations on ex officio proseit had been said that, on the 5th of Janu cutions for Libel, from the persons under ary 1818, they would be at 60 millions; prosecution, or their agents, from the 1st bot he was happy to say they were three January 1816, to the 1st January 1817; millious and a half less than that: they specifying the rale at which the charge amounted only to 56 millions and a half, was made, the total sum in each particuand a small sum more. On the other lar case, and to whose use it was applied. hand, it was to be considered that the Motion agreed to. funded debt had decreased, 19 millions. Mr. S. Bourne moved for the revival of

House Of LORDS, Feb. 5. the Committee on the Poor Laws, with The following Peers were appointed the addition of two new Members, to re Members of the Secret Committee:- The place the deceased Mr. Hall and Mr. Rose. Lord Chancellor, Earl of Harrowly, Duke

Mr. Curwen condemned the existing sys of Montrose, Earl of Liverpool, Marquis tem uf Poor Laws, as tending to break down Camden, Marquis of Lansdowne, Earl the spirit of the people, by making them Filzwilliam, Earl of Powis, Viscount Sidlook to the Poor-rates as a relief and refuge. mouth, Lords Grenville and Redesdale,

clear away.

FOREIGN OCCURRENCES.
FRANCE.

seems to have slipped from behind one A new Comet was discovered at Mar

of the sentry-boxes standing at each side seilles, on the night of the 26th of Dec. of the gateway, fired a pistol at the Duke, last, by M. Pons, in the constellation of though with so bad an aim that the bullet the Swan. It presents no extraordinary did not even strike the carriage. The senaspect in its appearances, and is expected tries gave the alarm, and the guard turned to arrive at its nearest point of proximity out; when the villain was pursned by the to the sun on the 3d of March.

soldiers, and by servaats of the Duke's The Duchess of Angouleme was the most 'household, but running off at fall speed, prominent and interesting personage at he was favoured by the darkness, and got the expiatory service of Louis XVI. at St.

His Grace heard the reportDenis, on the 21st ult. Her Royal High of the shot, which he supposed to arise ness was deeply affected by the melancholy from the accidental discharge of a musket remembrances which it excited ; and, on of one of the sentinels. it is slated, that the reading of her royal father's will, she the Duke had that day given a diplomatic was batbed in tears.

dinner; after which he went to an assembly The Speech of Lord Stanhope, in the at the house of Lady Crawford, in the Rue House of Lords, on the opening of the pre d'Anjou; whence it is conjectured the assent Session, (see p. 163) has produced a sassin must have watched his return home, great noise at Paris. A prodigious tomber and accompanied his Grace's carriage of translated copies of it are in circulation. through the streets; the coachman having

We are sorry to announce an attempt observed a man running with all his might, made at Paris, ou Wednesday the 11th in as if to reach the gate of the hotel before stant, upon the life of the Duke of Wel the carriage should arrive there. The lington. His Grace's carriage was enter French Government had assigned to the ing the gate of his hotel in the Rue des Duke a guard of honour, consisting of 24 Champs Elysées, when some wretch, who men, and commanded by a subaltern offi.

cer.

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