Friendship's Offering: And Winter's Wreath: a Christmas and New Year's Present

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Smith, Elder, 1829 - Gift books
 

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Page 151 - Take care of the pence and the pounds will take care of themselves is as true of personal habits as of money.
Page 335 - But man dieth, and wasteth away; yea, man giveth up the ghost, and where is he? "As the waters fail from the sea, and the flood decayeth and drieth up, 12 so man lieth down, and riseth not; till the heavens be no more, they shall not awake, nor be raised out of their sleep.
Page 332 - THE OLD FAMILIAR FACES. I HAVE had playmates, I have had companions, In my days of childhood, in my joyful school-days, All, all are gone, the old familiar faces. I have been laughing, I have been carousing, Drinking late, sitting late, with my bosom cronies, All, all are gone, the old familiar faces.
Page 332 - Seeking to find the old familiar faces. Friend of my bosom, thou more than a brother, Why wert not thou born in my father's dwelling? So might we talk of the old familiar faces. How some they have died, and some they have left me, And some are taken from me ; all are departed ; All, all are gone, the old familiar faces.
Page 87 - They are soonest with her in the woods, Peeping, the withered leaves among, To find the earliest fragrant thing That dares from the cold earth to spring, Or catch the earliest wM* bim s sotva.
Page 161 - The stranger's red strand, And won him the glory Of undying song. Keen cleaver of gay crests, Sharp piercer of broad breasts, Grim slayer of heroes, And scourge of the strong. FAME GIVER! I kiss thee. In a love more abiding Than that the heart knows, For maiden more lovely Than summer's first rose, My heart's knit to thine, And lives but for thee; In dreamings of gladness, Thou'rt dancing with me, Brave measures of madness In some battle-field, Where armour is ringing, And noble blood springing,...
Page 85 - The kindest and the happiest p"air Will find occasion to forbear; And something, every day they live, To pity, and perhaps forgive.
Page 2 - As in a glass, itself may find. And may the Poet's verse, alike, With all the power of painting strike, So freely, so divinely trace In every line,
Page 321 - These beauteous forms, Through a long absence, have not been to me As is a landscape to a blind man's eye : But oft, in lonely rooms, and 'mid the din Of towns and cities, I have owed to them In hours of weariness, sensations sweet, Felt in the blood, and felt along the heart; And passing even into my purer mind. With tranquil restoration...
Page 1 - Two lovely sisters here unite To blend improvement with delight; Painting and poetry engage By turns to deck the Album's page. Here may each glowing picture be The quintessence of Poesy, With skill SO exquisitely wrought. As if the colors were pure thought, — Thought from the bosom's inmost cell. By magic lints made visible, That, while the eye admires, the mind Itself, as in a glass, may find.

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