Cowper, Volume 2, Part 3

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Macmillan, 1904 - 135 pages

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Page 65 - Now stir the fire, and close the shutters fast, Let fall the curtains, wheel the sofa round, And while the bubbling and loud-hissing urn Throws up a steamy column, and the cups, That cheer but not inebriate, wait on each, So let us welcome peaceful evening in.
Page 125 - Twas my distress that brought thee low, My Mary ! Thy needles, once a shining store, For my sake restless heretofore, Now rust disused, and shine no more, My Mary...
Page 34 - My panting side was charged when I withdrew To seek a tranquil death in distant shades. ^ There was I found by one who had himself Been hurt by the archers. In his side he bore And in his hands and feet the cruel scars. With gentle force soliciting the darts He drew them forth, and healed and bade me live.
Page 65 - At his own wonders, wondering for his bread. *Tis pleasant through the loop-holes of retreat To peep at such a world ; to see the stir Of the great Babel and not feel the crowd ; To hear the roar she sends through all her gates At a safe distance, where the dying sound Falls a soft murmur on the uninjured ear.
Page 75 - Tis liberty alone that gives the flower Of fleeting life its lustre and perfume ; And we are weeds without it.
Page 125 - Thy silver locks, once auburn bright, Are still more lovely in my sight Than golden beams of orient light, My Mary ! For, could I view nor them nor thee, What sight worth seeing could I see ? The sun would rise in vain for me, My Mary ! Partakers of thy sad decline, Thy hands their little force resign ; Yet gently prest, press gently mine, My Mary!
Page 72 - Like homely-featured night, of clustering gems ; A star or two, just twinkling on thy brow, Suffices thee ; save that the moon is thine No less than hers : not worn indeed on high With ostentatious pageantry, but set With modest grandeur in thy purple zone, Resplendent less, but of an ampler round. Come then, and thou shalt find thy votary calm, Or make me so. Composure is thy gift...
Page 129 - Nor, cruel as it seem'd, could he Their haste himself condemn, Aware that flight, in such a sea, Alone could rescue them; Yet bitter felt it still to die Deserted, and his friends so nigh. He long survives, who lives an hour In ocean, self-upheld; And so long he, with unspent power, His destiny repell'd; And ever as the minutes flew, Entreated help, or cried - 'Adieu!
Page 69 - Of neighbouring fountain, or of rills that slip Through the cleft rock, and, chiming as they fall Upon loose pebbles, lose themselves at length In matted grass, that with a livelier green Betrays the secret of their silent course, Nature inanimate employs sweet sounds, But animated nature sweeter still, To soothe and satisfy the human ear.
Page 5 - I thank your ladyship for the information concerning the Methodist preachers : their doctrines are .most repulsive, and strongly tinctured with impertinence and disrespect towards their superiors, in perpetually endeavouring to level all ranks and do away with all distinctions. It is monstrous to be told, that you have a heart as sinful as the common wretches that crawl on the earth. This is highly offensive and insulting : and I cannot but wonder that your ladyship should relish any sentiments so...

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