Gods and Men in Egypt: 3000 BCE to 395 CE

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Cornell University Press, 2004 - History - 378 pages
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In their wide-ranging interpretation of the religion of ancient Egypt, Françoise Dunand and Christiane Zivie-Coche explore how, over a period of roughly 3500 years, the Egyptians conceptualized their relations with the gods. Drawing on the insights of anthropology, the authors discuss such topics as the identities, images, and functions of the gods; rituals and liturgies; personal forms of piety expressing humanity's need to establish a direct relation with the divine; and the afterlife, a central feature of Egyptian religion. That religion, the authors assert, was characterized by the remarkable continuity of its ritual practices and the ideas of which they were an expression.Throughout, Dunand and Zivie-Coche take advantage of the most recent archaeological discoveries and scholarship. Gods and Men in Egypt is unique in its coverage of Egyptian religious expression in the Ptolemaic and Roman periods. Written with nonspecialist readers in mind, it is largely concerned with the continuation of Egypt's traditional religion in these periods, but it also includes fascinating accounts of Judaism in Egypt and the appearance and spread of Christianity there.
 

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Contents

THE WORLD OF THE GODS
5
Cosmogonies Creation and Time
42
The Gods on Earth
71
Of Men and Gods
107
Death Will Come
153
BOOK PTOLEMAIC AND ROMAN EGYPT
193
The Reactions of the Priests
206
The Creation of Sarapis
214
New Gods and Cults
240
Problems and Controversies
267
The World of the Temples and Its Activities
285
From Learned Religion to Popular Religion
299
Funerary Beliefs and Rituals
319
Conclusion
339
Maps
351
Bibliography
357

The Vitality of the Traditional Religion
225

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About the author (2004)

David Lorton, an Egyptologist, is the translator of many books, including Erik Hornung's books The Secret Lore of Egypt and Akhenaten and the Religion of Light , both from Cornell.

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