A Brief History of Neoliberalism

Front Cover
Oxford University Press, 2007 - Business & Economics - 247 pages
Neoliberalism--the doctrine that market exchange is an ethic in itself, capable of acting as a guide for all human action--has become dominant in both thought and practice throughout much of the world since 1970 or so. Writing for a wide audience, David Harvey, author of The New Imperialism and The Condition of Postmodernity, here tells the political-economic story of where neoliberalization came from and how it proliferated on the world stage. Through critical engagement with this history, he constructs a framework, not only for analyzing the political and economic dangers that now surround us, but also for assessing the prospects for the more socially just alternatives being advocated by many oppositional movements.
 

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Excerpted from Inside Higher Ed with permission. If you’re wondering how government got so caught up in the well-being of Wall Street, I have a book for you: A Brief History of Neoliberalism by David ... Read full review

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I had been teaching about neo-liberal economic theory in my class and thought I should probably read this book to understand it better. I'm glad I did. In addition to explaining the nuts and bolts of ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
1 Freedoms Just Another Word
5
2 The Construction of Consent
39
3 The Neoliberal State
64
4 Uneven Geographical Developments
87
5 Neoliberalism with Chinese Characteristics
120
6 Neoliberalism on Trial
152
7 Freedoms Prospect
183
Notes
207
Bibliography
223
Index
235
Copyright

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About the author (2007)


David Harvey is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He formerly held professorial posts at Oxford University and The Johns Hopkins University, and has written extensively on the political economy of globalization, urbanization, and cultural change. Oxford University Press published his book 'The New Imperialism' in September 2003 (reissued in paperback February 2005).

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