Ethnic Chicago: A Multicultural Portrait

Front Cover
Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, May 19, 1995 - History - 648 pages
This award-winning study of ethnic life in Chicago richly details the various peoples and ethnic institutions in America's heartland city. This newly revised and expanded edition also includes chapters on African-American migration, Chatham, Latino Chicago, the Chinese in Chicago, Asian Indians, Korean-Americans, the new entrepreneurial immigrants, and the Swedes. There is also a new six-chapter section that examines saloons, sports, crime, churches, neighborhoods, and cemeteries.
 

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Contents

The Founding Fathers The Absorption of FrenchIndian Chicago 18161837
17
Irish Chicago Church Homeland Politics and ClassThe Shaping of an Ethnic Group 18701900
57
German American Ethnic and Cultural Identity from 1890 Onward
93
A Community Created Chicago Swedes 18801950
110
The Jews of Chicago From Shtetl to Suburb
122
Polish Chicago Survival through Solidarity
173
Ukrainian Chicago The Making of a Nationality Group in America
199
Chicagos Italians A Survey of the Ethnic Factor 18501990
229
Japanese Americans Melting into the AllAmerican Melting Pot
409
Asian Indians in Chicago Growth and Change in a Model Minority
438
Koreans of Chicago The New Entrepreneurial Immigrants
463
The Ethnic Saloon A Public Melting Pot
503
Ethnic Sports
529
Ethnic Crime The Organized Underworld of Early 20th Century Chicago
557
The Ethnic Church
574
Chicagos Ethnic Neighborhoods The Myth of Stability and the Reality of Change
604

Greek Survival in Chicago
260
AfricanAmerican Migration to Chicago
303
Chatham An AfricanAmerican Success Story
341
Latino Chicago
346
The Chinese in Chicago The First One Hundred Years
378
Ethnic Cemeteries Underground Rites
618
Contributors
640
Index
643
Copyright

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Page 17 - And it is time to go, to bid farewell to one's own self, and find an exit from the fallen self.
Page 27 - The village presents no cheering prospect, as, notwithstanding its antiquity, it consists of but few huts, inhabited by a miserable race of men, scarcely equal to the Indians from whom they are descended. Their log or bark houses are low, filthy and disgusting, displaying not the least trace of comfort...