Theories in Second Language Acquisition: An Introduction

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Bill VanPatten, Jessica Williams
Routledge, Dec 22, 2014 - Education - 296 pages

The second edition of Theories in Second Language Acquisition seeks to build on the strengths of the first edition by surveying the major theories currently used in second language acquisition research. This volume is an ideal introductory text for undergraduate and graduate students in SLA and language teaching. Each chapter focuses on a single theory, written by a leading scholar in the field in an easy-to-follow style – a basic foundational description of the theory, relevant data or research models used with this theory, common misunderstandings, and a sample study from the field to show the theory in practice. This text is designed to provide a consistent and coherent presentation for those new to the field who seek basic understanding of theories that underlie contemporary SLA research. Researchers will also find the book useful as a "quick guide" to theoretical work outside their respective domains.

 

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second language acquisitions theories

Contents

The Nature of Theories
1
2 Early Theories in SLA
17
3 Linguistic Theory Universal Grammar and Second Language Acquisition
34
The ConceptOriented Approach
54
5 UsageBased Approaches to SLA
75
6 Skill Acquisition Theory
94
7 Input Processing in Adult SLA
113
A Neurobiologically Motivated Theory of First and Second Language
135
10 Input Interaction and Output in Second Language Acquisition
180
11 Sociocultural Theory and Second Language Development
207
12 Complexity Theory
227
13 Second Language Learning Explained? SLA across 10 Contemporary Theories
245
Contributors
273
Glossary
277
Index
287
Copyright

9 Processability Theory
159

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About the author (2014)

Bill VanPatten is Professor of Spanish and Second Language Acquisition at Michigan State University.

Jessica Williams is Professor of Linguisics at University of Illinois at Chicago.

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