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The ARGUMENT.

The subject proposed. Addressed to Mr. Onslow. A

prospect of the fields ready for harvest. Reflections in praise of industry. raised by that view. Reaping. A tale relative to it. A harvest storm. Shooting and hunting, their barbarity. A ludicrous account of foxhunting. A view of an orchard. Wall-fruit. A vineyard. A description of fogs, frequent in the latter part of Autumn: whence a digresion, enquiring into the rise of fountains and rivers. Birds of seafon considered, that now shift their habitation. The prodigious number of them that cover the northern and western isles of ScoTLAND. Hence a view of the country. A prospect of the discoloured, fading woods. After a gentle dusky day, moon-light. Autumnal me

Morning : to which succeeds a calm, pure, fun-fhiny day, such as usually shuts up the season. The harvest being gathered in, the country disolved in joy. The whole concludes with a panegyric on a philosophical country life.

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1.1774. Publishid

as the Act directis; by.ZMurray N32 Fleet Street, London.

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Onslow! the Muse, ambitious of thy name,
To grace, inspire, and dignify her song,
Would from the Public Voice thy gentle ear
A while engage. Thy noble cares she knows,
The patriot virtues that distend thy thought,
Spread on thy front, and in thy bosom glow;
While litening senates hang upon thy tongue,

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Devolving

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Devolving thro' the maze of eloquence
A roll of periods, sweeter than her song.
But she too pants for public virtue, she,
Tho' weak of power, yet strong in ardent will,
Whene'er her country rushes on her heart,
Affumes a bolder note, and fondly tries
To mix the patriot's with the poet's flame.

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When the bright Virgin gives the beauteous days,
And Libra weighs in equal fcales the year ;
From heaven's high cope the fierce effulgence shook 25
Of parting Summer, a serener blue,
With golden light enlivened, wide invests
The happy world. Attemper'd funs arise,
Sweet-beam'd, and fhedding oft thro' lucid clouds
A pleasing calm; while broad, and brown, below 30
Extensive harvests hang the heavy head.
Rich, filent, deep, they stand; for not a gale
Rolls its light billows o'er the bending plain :
A calm of plenty! till the ruffled air
Falls from its poise, and gives the breeze to blow. 35
Rent is the fleecy mantle of the sky;
The clouds fly different; and the sudden fun
By fits effulgent gilds th' illumin’d field,

And

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