The Autobiography and Correspondence of Mary Granville, Mrs. Delany: With Interesting Reminiscences of King George the Third and Queen Charlotte, Volume 1

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Page 611 - The world was all before him, where to choose His place of rest, and Providence his guide.3 80.
Page 262 - Some testimonies of learned men, in favour of the intended edition of the Saxon Homilies, concerning the learning of the author of those homilies, and the advantages to be hoped for from an edition of them. In a letter from the publisher to a doctor in divinity...
Page 464 - Strolling about the house, he saw me first sitting on the pavement of the lumber room with Louis, all over cobwebs and dirt and mortar ; then found me in his own room on a ladder writing on a picture ; and half an hour afterwards lying on the grass in the court with the dogs and the children, in my slippers and without my hat.
Page 72 - Soon after this, lord Peterborough endeavoured to convince her of his partial regard for her; but, agreeable and artful as he was, she remained very much upon her guard, which rather increased than diminished his admiration and passion for her. Yet still his pride struggled with his inclination ; for all this time she was engaged to sing in public, a circumstance very grievous to her, but urged by the best of motives, she submitted to it, in order to assist her parents, whose fortune was much reduced...
Page 194 - ... that the king will see as few as he wishes at his court, particularly such as dare to think or speak truth. I dare not do otherwise...
Page 291 - As for the generality of people that I meet with here, they are much the same as in England — a mixture of good and bad. All that I have met with behave themselves very decently according to their rank; now and then an oddity breaks out, but never so extraordinary but that I can match them in England. There is a heartiness among them that is more like Cornwall than any I have known, and great sociableness.
Page 140 - King differing so much from the last, that all the pageantry and splendour, badges and trappings of royalty, were as pleasing to the son as they were irksome to the father.
Page 48 - ... of service, although it might be difficult to see how their experience was improved by it. It was no uncommon thing for a commission to be obtained for a child in the cradle ; and when he came from college, the fortunate youth was at least a lieutenant of some standing, by dint of fair promotion. To sum up this catalogue of abuses, commissions were in some instances bestowed upon young ladies, when pensions could not be had. We...
Page 319 - Dean of Deny in 1724, and married in August, 1728, Anne, eldest daughter of the Right Hon. John Foster, Speaker of the Irish House of Commons. Lord Montjoy's ball, which was limited to twenty-four couple, who danced in turn, affords a good example to the ball-givers of the present day, where dancing is rendered the exception at balls, in consequence of the total disregard which is paid to the proportion between space and numbers. Dancing in 1731 appears to have been a real enjoyment, and an invitation...
Page 158 - Yesterday I was at the rehearsal of the new opera composed by Handel : I like it extremely, but the taste of the town is so depraved, that nothing will be approved of but the burlesque. The Beggars' Opera entirely triumphs over the Italian one ; I have not yet seen it, but everybody that has seen it, says it is very comical and full of humour ; the songs will soon be published, and I will send them to you.

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