Who was the first paper-maker? (Industries, tools & implements of animals).

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Page 30 - Who bid the stork, Columbus-like, explore Heavens not his own, and worlds unknown before? Who calls the council, states the certain day ? Who forms the phalanx, and who points the way ? III.
Page 31 - Thus then to man the voice of nature spake, ' Go, from the creatures thy instructions take : Learn from the birds what food the thickets yield; Learn from the beasts the physic of the field ; Thy arts of building from the bee receive; Learn of the mole to plow, the worm to weave; Learn of the little nautilus to sail, Spread the thin oar, and catch the driving gale.
Page 64 - And men shall speak of the might of thy terrible acts: And I will declare thy greatness. They shall abundantly utter the memory of thy great goodness, And shall sing of thy righteousness.
Page 42 - Which strike ev'n eyes incurious ; but each moss, Each shell, each crawling insect, holds a rank Important in the plan of Him who framed This scale of beings ; holds a rank which lost Would break the chain, and leave behind a gap Which Nature's self would rue.
Page 31 - Go, from the creatures thy instructions take : Learn from the birds what food the thickets yield ; Learn from the beasts the physic of the field: Thy arts of building from the bee receive; Learn of the mole to plough, the worm to weave ; Learn of the little nautilus to sail ; Spread the thin oar, and catch the driving gale: Here too all forms of social union find, And hence let reason, late, instruct mankind: Here subterranean works and cities see; There towns aerial on the waving tree: Learn each...
Page 56 - I don't know ; it was perfectly kneaded, and free from all lumps, or grit, and was worked, when laid on, as freely as butter. I suspect that it was formed of dry dust, on which she had poured a drop of fluid from her mouth. She laid the substance on the open end of the unfinished cell, and spread it about with her jaws very expeditiously and skilfully, till the orifice was quite closed up. She then flew off, and returned with a similar load, which she applied upon the last to make it thicker. When...
Page 59 - ... clapped her load of mortar on it. I noticed that while working, though the wings were closed incumbently, she kept up a shrill buzz, like that of a bee when held in the fingers ; her antennae, which were usually carried nearly straight, were during the plastering curled up, and continually vibrating, and moving on the surface of the work, evidently trying it by touch, which seemed to me adverse to the theory that calls the antennae
Page 47 - You must try to think of — to realize — huge trees, soaring to the height of one hundred and one hundred and fifty feet ; trees whose...
Page 53 - ... Those of meaner condition can only be men to one another ; and it were well if they would be so : but he that is highly raised and advanced above others hath the happy opportunity in his hands, if he have but the heart to make use of it, to be a kind of god to men. Let no man, then, of what birth, or rank, or quality soever, think it beneath him to serve God, and to be useful to the benefit and advantage of men.
Page 32 - Beasts, birds and insects, even to the minutest and meanest of their kind, act with the unerring providence of instinct; man, the while, who possesses a higher faculty, abuses it, and therefore goes blundering on. They, by their unconscious and unhesitating obedience to the laws of nature, fulfil the end of their existence ; he, in wilful neglect of the laws of God, loses sight of the end of his.

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