Tragedy of Coriolanus

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Harper & brothers, 1882 - 279 pages
 

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Page 152 - Cor. Like a dull actor now, I have forgot my part, and I am out, Even to a full disgrace. — Best of my flesh, Forgive my tyranny ; but do not say, For that,
Page 40 - I'll never Be such a gosling to obey instinct, but stand, As if a man were author of himself And knew no other kin.
Page 42 - Cut me to pieces, Volsces ; men and lads, Stain all your edges on me. Boy ! False hound ! If you have writ your annals true, 'tis there, That, like an eagle in a dove-cote, I Flutter'd your Volscians in Corioli : Alone I did it. Boy ! Auf.
Page 51 - Deserves your hate: and your affections are A sick man's appetite, who desires most that Which would increase his evil. He that depends Upon your favours, swims with fins of lead, And hews down oaks with rushes. Hang ye ! Trust ye ? With every minute you do change a mind; And call him noble, that was now your hate, Him vile, that was your garland.
Page 239 - I have of late, but wherefore I know not, lost all my mirth, forgone all custom of exercises ; and indeed it goes so heavily with my disposition that this goodly frame, the earth, seems to me a sterile promontory ; this most excellent canopy, the air, look you, this brave o'erhanging firmament, this majestical roof fretted with golden fire, why, it appears no other thing to me than a foul and pestilent congregation of vapours.
Page 202 - I must have liberty Withal, as large a charter as the wind, To blow on whom I please...
Page 178 - ... besides, thou hast not hitherto showed thy poor mother any courtesy. And therefore it is not only honest, but due unto me, that without compulsion I should obtain my so just and reasonable request of thee. But since by reason I cannot persuade thee to it, to what purpose do I defer my last hope...

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